Immigrant Experience Inspires Latino Leaders to Meet Current Challenges

1. Blog

Mural by Mel Waters and David Hyde Cho, Mission and 19th Streets, San Francisco Mission District. Photo credit: Nehama Rogozen, California Reinvestment Coalition

As the Senate takes up the debate on an immigration bill — and the White House ramps up deportation efforts and looks to punish immigrant families from using social services to which they are legally entitled — the California Reinvestment Coalition (CRC) is taking action. CRC’s new program, “Here to Stay: Building Financial Security for Immigrants,” builds on other “know your rights” initiatives and seeks to help immigrant families navigate this changing environment.

Immigrants have long been excluded from the economic mainstream in structural ways, leading to lack of opportunity and a growing economic divide between immigrant and non-immigrant communities. But in this time of heightened anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies coming from Washington, there is an urgent need for community-led solutions that ensure everyone has equal access to the American dream.

Along with many other allies and members engaged in this new program, Mission Economic Development Agency (MEDA) will work closely with CRC on this new initiative. Learning from the Mission neighborhood’s Latino heritage and history of displacement, CRC will use these lessons to inform our work across urban and rural California. In addition to a shared vision of greater economic equity for immigrant families, both CRC and MEDA are led by community leaders with their own personal immigrant stories.

Paulina Gonzalez: A legacy of immigrant activism

CRC Executive Director Paulina Gonzalez (photo, right) is well versed in the power of the immigrant experience, being a first generation American whose father who courageously headed north to create a better life for himself, and others.

“My father emigrated from Mexico, crossing the desert on foot. Despite having the limited opportunity of just a second-grade education, his innate passion for the greater good was the impetus for his later spearheading a campaign to unionize garment workers,” says Gonzalez.

Similarly, Gonzalez’ mother’s family were also immigrants, aiding Arizona miners endeavoring to form unions. Her mother even earned a bachelor’s degree in her 50s, becoming a caseworker for those with disabilities.

This compelling background led to Gonzalez’s work for over two decades leading economic justice organizing campaigns to expand the rights of immigrants, workers, and underrepresented communities of color. It’s in her DNA.

Luis Granados: An immigrant leader

Complementing Gonzalez’ experience is that of MEDA Executive Director Luis Granados (photo, left), who recently stepped into the role of CRC’s board chair.

During his formative years, Granados resided in Juárez, Mexico. Being a few miles from the United States meant regular border crossings — an experience that holds challenging memories.  

Explains Granados of his immigrant experience: “My family would cross the border — and that bridge — into El Paso, Texas on a regular basis to work or shop, or to simply visit relatives and friends. Immigration officers invariably questioned our motives, and, through their treatment, convicted us on the spot of being immigrants. We were not treated as a humble family living a normal, dignified life. Forty years later, the vitriol aimed at immigrants is disturbingly familiar. It was wrong then. It is wrong now.”

Once in California, then 13-year-old Granados and his family harnessed the power of education and hard work to obtain the American dream — as has been the case for newcomers to the U.S. for hundreds of years.

The drive for community equity has been the catalyst for Granados successfully leading MEDA from solely being a longtime direct-service provider to also being an innovative affordable-housing developer (over 1,100 homes in the pipeline), growing small-business lender (Adelante Fund CDFI), and main player in the realm of policy and advocacy for San Francisco’s Mission District and beyond.

Program Background: Devaluation of the importance of immigration

The current administration’s policies have increasingly threatened the financial well-being of low-income communities, regardless of legal status. The recently passed tax bill is an example of a regressive policy which will line the pockets of the 1 percent at the expense of low-income communities. Corresponding funding deficits from this skewed tax structure will necessitate budget cuts for social service programs for low- and moderate-income people.

This assault is mostly aimed at immigrant communities, demonized in a political ploy to activate this President’s core right-wing constituency. There are almost daily overarching references by this administration to immigrants being “less than,” rather than that of newcomers seeking lives of opportunity and dignity.

As the Trump administration seeks to push immigrants further into the shadows, the economic threat of further marginalizing our communities looms large. CRC’s members have reported immigrant clients leaving their jobs, seeking fewer services, avoiding medical appointments and even pulling their children from school due to fear of immigration raids. This is a community living in terror, with generational repercussions as incomes are negatively impacted and the wealth gap grows, with families unable to save and falling prey to predatory financial services.

Communities lead

Here to Stay is a response to these challenges, and CRC is well-placed to develop this initiative. The foundation of this initiative is allowing our communities to lead. CRC recently hired Here to Stay’s first organizer, an immigrant herself, who will work directly with immigrant communities to identify obstacles to financial and economic security. CRC will develop grassroots leaders to advocate for community-driven solutions, such as ensuring that banks serve all Californians and provide products that meet the unique need of immigrants. CRC will also work with banks to ensure access, cultural competency, and affordability in all products. Communities will not only identify corporate policies that need to be addressed, but also promote new state and local government policies.

CRC works with unbanked communities like those in the rural Coachella Valley, where banks can be more than 20 miles apart and immigrants are particularly vulnerable to devastating financial losses as a result of keeping their money in cash at home. MEDA’s work in offering small-business owners access to capital and in providing culturally relevant technical assistance helps immigrant entrepreneurs in San Francisco’s Mission District, such as Alicia Villanueva of Alicia’s Tamales Los Mayas, who started out in her home and now employs 18 community members.

The partnership between CRC and MEDA will allow both organizations to use these proven models throughout California, work closely with banks to better serve all communities, and, ultimately, result in the equitable treatment of immigrant communities.

California Reinvestment Coalition Recommendations on Updating the Community Reinvestment Act

Community reinvestment act 2

Fact Sheet: Community Reinvestment Act Recommendations

To truly meet community needs, CRC members believe the CRA should be improved and strengthened. In a recent survey, 100% of members said that the level of CRA activity in their community needed improvement and that there was considerable room for banks to do more.

CRC recommends that CRA be reformed so that:

1. CRA implementation encourages, not discourages, reinvestment in rural areas. California is home to numerous rural reinvestment deserts, where a lack of lending and investment prevents communities from thriving economically. And yet, many of these areas already have bank branches and are included in bank CRA assessment areas. Regulators subject bank CRA activity in these areas to a lower level of scrutiny, as banks are able to denote these areas as subject to only “limited scope” review. For example, Bakersfield, California, has numerous bank branches, and those banks have CRA obligations in the city. However, these same banks are examined for their CRA activity far more closely in other, more urban areas of the state. This creates fierce competition, for example, for housing tax credit deals in urban areas, while rural projects struggle to find financing. Instead, regulators should ensure that the banks with the largest deposits in a given MSA are subject to a full scope review in that MSA.

2. Regulators should encourage banks to develop transparent, multi-year CRA Plans that reflect significant public input and that include measurable goals, such as tying reinvestment activity to a percentage of bank deposits. Banks are supposed to help meet community credit needs. And in many bank merger applications, banks must demonstrate that the merger will provide a community benefit. The public input process is critical to this assessment.

However, community input has been diluted, and is not sufficiently sought and considered under current CRA implementation, as an example, very few mergers will even have public hearings. Mergers most often lead to diminished resources for communities as 1 + 1 rarely equals 2 in terms of reinvestment. That is why a comprehensive review of mergers is so important, complete with strong community input and mitigation of any harm the merger may cause in the form of decreased reinvestment or reduced access to banking services or branches.

Regulators should encourage CRA plans, particularly in the context of mergers that must show a clear public benefit to the community. Strong and meaningful CRA plans reflect community input about community credit needs, motivate banks by setting strong goals for lending, investment and services, and allow communities to work in partnership with banks to ensure that they are treated equitably and fairly by financial institutions. CRA plans are a best practice that have resulted in significant gains for communities in the past few years. Strong CRA plans can help demonstrate that a merger will have a public benefit.

3. Banks should be downgraded for causing, enabling, or financing harm in communities, taking into account discrimination, and equity stripping conduct and transactions that lead to displacement. The CRA calls for an assessment of how well or poorly a bank is meeting community credit needs. This analysis must include an assessment of fair housing and related factors. Regulators should conduct a comprehensive review of a bank’s community impact. Wells Fargo is but the most recent example to demonstrate that simply investing in the community is insufficient- banks must also not cause harm or break the law.

For a regulator to give a bank a passing CRA grade while the bank engages in discriminatory lending would be to endorse discrimination. Further, a high CRA rating for a discriminatory bank could result in consumers being directed to a bank with an inflated CRA rating, only for the bank to potentially overcharge the consumer or deny that person a loan. In this way, regulators would abuse the public’s trust in its ratings.

Bank regulators should consider expensive overdraft programs and excessive reliance on fee revenue generated at the expense of the most economically vulnerable consumers as a basis for downgrading a bank in a CRA service test evaluation. Similarly, banks should be downgraded for financing high cost, predatory lenders, and for contributing to gentrification and displacement. Banks should also suffer CRA rating downgrades as a result of any involvement in the REO to Rental craze, which results in first time homebuyers being outbid by cash investors, tenants being displaced by Wall Street landlords, and neighborhoods losing long term residents as well as racial and income diversity.

4. Encourages banks to open and maintain branches in LMI and rural areas. Bank branches remain a critical part of how banks serve communities, and inequitable distribution of branches must be considered as part of the CRA service test. Critically, regulators cannot allow the industry’s preference for technology to result in fewer branches and shrinking CRA assessment areas, footprints, and obligations in LMI communities. Additionally, many LMI neighborhoods and communities of color not only lack access to bank branches, but also to a wide range of banking products and services, including ATMs.  Regulators should analyze whether banks are meeting the banking needs of all communities in their assessment areas.

Regulators should also consider how banks can better reduce the number of unbanked or underbanked consumers within their assessment areas. Moreover, banks should quantify the extent to which LMI bank customers are able to keep their accounts open and in good standing over time, or if their customers are pushed out of the bank by overdraft fees or other barriers. Low cost bank accounts should be offered and accessible to LMI consumers, including through bank acceptance of municipal identification cards and other accessible forms of ID.

5. Assessment areas should include areas where banks have branches, or where a significant number of their customers and depositors live. Regulation has lagged behind market innovation. Requiring reinvestment only around retail branches makes much less sense today, when internet, credit card, and fintech banks operate nationally but reinvest only in Salt Lake City or another headquarters location.

Assessment areas should be expanded to include areas where a substantial portion of a bank’s depositors and borrowers reside. At the same time, banks should not be allowed to receive additional CRA credit for lending or investing outside of the bank’s CRA assessment area, beyond the accommodation made to banks by regulators during the last CRA Questions and Answers review. This will only lead to a dilution of investment in LMI neighborhoods that are most in need of reinvestment. The primary purpose of the CRA is to serve communities where the bank is doing business, not to encourage reinvestment where it is easiest to do. Banks should not be able to circumvent obligations to serve the communities in their assessment areas. The focus of bank CRA should remain on LMI individuals and communities.

6. CRA examinations should consider and reflect new small business lending data that the CFPB will be overseeing. Small businesses are the lifeblood of our economy, prime job creators, and bulwarks of the community. Yet small business owners benefit from fewer protections than homeowners. HMDA data has been collected for years, and used to inform CRA examinations, without problem or incident. Small business owners should also benefit from a comprehensive and unified lending data collection system.

CRC members strongly support Congress’ charge in Dodd-Frank that §1071 small business lending data be collected in order to facilitate enforcement of fair lending laws and enable communities, governmental entities, and creditors to identify business and community development needs and opportunities of women-owned, minority-owned, and small businesses. Such data collection and dissemination will surely make affordable credit more accessible to all small businesses, and will inform CRA examinations.

A recent CRC survey of our CDFI, community lender and technical assistance provider member organizations revealed that small business clients still face discrimination; are pushed by banks towards higher priced credit cards; are frequently targeted for nonbank credit products (like Merchant Cash Advances), and are in need of greater access to affordable, safe, and transparent credit.

7. Banks serve all segments of the community, including the immigrant community. Banks can and should serve the immigrant community by directly providing loans and investments to immigrants, and by supporting community lenders and other organizations that serve the immigrant community. Immigrant community members have significant unmet credit needs, whether it is a safe place to save money, a loan to buy a house, purchase a car, start a businesses, or pursue a citizenship application.

Banks should ensure that employees represent the diversity of their service areas, and make translation, interpretation and related language access services available to all potential clients. Banks should make loans and investments accessible to all community members, and invest and support community lenders and other organizations that serve the immigrant community.

8. The bank examination process can be improved so that years do not go by after an examination before the pubic rating is released. The regulators should hire additional examiners and provide enhanced training to ensure that there is consistency in the examination process across agencies and examiners. CRC believes that a primary reason behind the delay in the public release of CRA ratings is the propensity of banks to challenge and appeal initial CRA ratings by regulators. This process should be reformed to limit the circumstances in which a bank can challenge a rating, and the public should be given an opportunity to comment on the appeal when a bank invokes this otherwise opaque process. It is of critical importance that regulators set high standards of review.

To make CRA meaningful, regulators have to end the long history of CRA grade inflation so that poor CRA performance will be reflected in CRA ratings. Streamlining the process while lowering the examination bar will only lead to less investment, more harm to communities, and potentially, to greater risk in the US financial system. We saw this happen in the years leading up the financial crisis, when regulatory agencies competed against each other to attract banks to their charters, fueling a regulatory race to the bottom, and leading ultimately to the failure of several savings and loans and the end of the Office of Thrift Supervision.

CRC Speaks about Small Biz Owners and Financing Challenges at CFPB CAB Hearing


Paula Tejada, owner of Chile Lindo, speaks to CFPB Director Cordray and Assistant Director Grady Hedgespeth about being a small biz owner in the Mission District of San Francisco. Learn about the CFPB’s tour here.

Today, Paulina Gonzalez, the executive director of the California Reinvestment Coalition, will be speaking at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Consumer Advisory Board meeting about the challenges that Small Business owners face in obtaining safe, transparent loans to start and grow their businesses.  CRC is strongly supportive of the CFPB’s effort to implement the 1071 data collection called for under the Dodd Frank financial reform bill.

Gonzalez’ presentation highlights how loans to smaller small banks have decreased; how small business owners are being pushed to credit cards (instead of small business loans); and how some predatory lenders are filling in the gaps.

CRC has been monitoring access to loans for small business owners in California for a number of years, and the results have been especially disappointing:

2007-2009: According to CRC’s analysis and report (The Little Engine that Could), SBA lending to California’s minority-owned businesses dropped by 81 percent for African American-owned businesses and 84 percent for Latino-owned businesses. See report: Small Business Access to Credit

2007-2013: According to CRC’s analysis of SBA data, small business lending, especially to African Americans and Latinos dropped dramatically from 2007 to 2013.

Report Finding Include:

Bank Loans Guaranteed by the U.S. Small Business Administration Fall Dramatically:

  • There was a 60% drop in the number of small business loans made from FFY 2007 to FFY 2013.
  • In FFY 2013, only 2% (96 loans) of SBA 7a loans were made to businesses owned by African-Americans, 11% to Latinos (634 loans), and 14% to women (846 loans).
  • Credit needs of the smallest small businesses are being ignored: the average SBA 7a loan tripled in size from $165,723 in 2007 to $498,971 in 2013.

Conventional Small Business loans decline for 4 of the 5 largest banks

  • For conventional small business loans, four of the five major banks decreased the amount of loans they were making in 2012 by about 2/3 as compared to 2007 in five key counties (Alameda, Fresno, Los Angeles, Sacramento and San Diego).
  • US Bank increased its overall small business lending by more than 17% in these counties, while JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, and Citibank all made far fewer loans in 2012.

Practitioners Report Difficulties in Getting Loans, Esp. for Smallest Businesses 

  • CRC polled our member organizations who work directly with small businesses. Seventy-three percent of respondents stated that banks are doing less lending to small businesses (revenue of less than $1 million annually) in 2013 than 2012.
  • Ninety-two percent of them stated that banks are not doing significant lending at the $150,000 or less level.

California Reinvestment Coalition Goes to Washington

Last week, members of the California Reinvestment Coalition traveled to Washington, DC, for the annual National Community Reinvestment Coalition conference.  The theme this year was “Creating a Just Economy.”

Keynote speakers during the conference included Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, CFPB Director Richard Cordray, Representative Maxine Waters who is Ranking Member of the House Financial Services Committee, Comptroller Thomas Curry, Senator Sherrod Brown who is Ranking Member of the Senate Banking Committee, Mark Morial, CEO of the National Urban League, and John Taylor, president and CEO of NCRC.

There were a number of sessions focused on reinvestment, affordable housing, small business lending, home ownership, gentrification, economic development, CDFIs, community health benefit agreements, fintech, rural development, fair housing, the racial wealth gap, the Community Reinvestment Act, redlining, and more, including a session entitled “Defending the CFPB” that Paulina Gonzalez, executive director of CRC, moderated.

In addition to attending the conference, CRC members also met with members of the California Congressional delegation and with bank regulators and their staff as well.  During the meetings, CRC members shared what they are seeing from their work in communities, specifically around issues related to small business lending, affordable housing and economic development.

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The president’s so-called “skinny budget” proposal was one of several topics covered at the meetings, and more background about the additional issues is included below.


Budget Proposal Impact on California

HUD Budget 

Eliminates CDBG, reductions for key programs serving renters Loss of $357 million in CDBG funds for CA cities;

$130 million in HOME funds for new affordable housing; Thousands of tenants to lose rental assistance vouchers;

More costs for Medicaid as seniors move to nursing homes w/o Meals on Wheels;

Increased homelessness;



Fewer loans, less support for Small Biz Owners. There are 86 CDFIs in CA that made 39,000+ loans in FY 2016.

Legal Services Corporation


11 CA orgs. receive funding through LSC.

Small Business Administration

Prime program defunded; Microloan program frozen Less financing available for CA small businesses.



Will harm efforts at building assets, including for 1st time homebuyers, also negative impacts for affordable housing.
AmeriCorps Eliminated

Work on tax returns, literacy, emergency response, health, and economic development.


Community Reinvestment Act

This year, CRA celebrates its 40th anniversary. Because of the CRA, financial institutions are helping to meet important community credit needs and building consumer and community wealth, through small business lending, mortgage lending, affordable housing finance, community development activity and bank branch and account access.

  • California Reinvestment Coalition members and other community groups have recently negotiated win-win community commitments with a number of banks, including City National, Bank of Hope, Cathay Bank and Mechanics Bank.
  • But bank regulators need to be more rigorous and timely in their CRA and Fair Lending examinations of banks. Wells Fargo had not had a CRA rating made public in 9 years, and several banks, such as BancorpSouth and Evans Bank that received Satisfactory CRA ratings were later sued for redlining.
  • Regulators should encourage banks to develop Community Benefit Plan agreements with local community groups, and incorporate these agreements into any bank merger approval and subsequent CRA exams.
  • Regulators should also provide CRA downgrades to institutions that engage in discriminatory, unfair, or deceptive practices, or that finance the direct or indirect displacement of low and moderate income people and communities of color, or that finance lenders who make predatory loans in these communities. Banks must diversify management and staff, and develop robust supplier diversity programs.

Rural Communities

Rural communities in California face unique and significant challenges. Banks are well placed to help local communities develop and grow through home mortgage and small business lending, affordable housing investments and low cost accounts.

  • But nonprofit groups and even some banks report that banks only lend and invest in geographic areas that are subject to “full scope” regulatory review (via CRA exams),  that tend to focus on larger, urban areas, especially for the largest banks.
  • Bank regulators should expand the number of full scope areas for banks that are among the biggest depositories and lenders in smaller, rural communities. Branch closings, especially in rural areas, are also effectively limiting access to banking for consumers.

Protect CFPB

The Dodd Frank Act and the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau are the most effective and publicly popular responses to the financial crisis.

  • The CFPB has secured over $12 billion in consumer relief, more than all of the other, relevant federal agencies combined.
  • The CFPB developed common sense rules that brought order and transparency to mortgages (Qualified Mortgage and QRM rules, home loan modifications (servicing rules, including successors in interest protections), and the collection of home loan data (HMDA rule).
  • Additionally, CFPB enforcement actions have protected consumers and communities from unlawful lending discrimination and unfair and deceptive practices.
  • Importantly, over 1 million consumers (including over 118,000 Californians) have already taken advantage of the CFPB’s user-friendly consumer complaint database to file complaints -some telling their stories – to seek relief but also to inform other consumers and CFPB enforcement officers about problematic practices and actors.
  • The CFPB’s Director, structure and authority must be vigorously protected.
  • Important CFPB rules on payday lending, prepaid cards, mandatory arbitration, debt collection and small business loan data must be finalized and protected from repeal.
  • We also support the CFPB’s work on issues that have important impacts on consumers, ranging from student loans to credit reporting agencies to financing for cars.

Small Business Lending

  • Small business lending has increased since Dodd Frank Act, not decreased as some Dodd Frank critics have suggested. But small business loans are still less available in LMI neighborhoods and neighborhoods of color
  • And many small business owners looking for credit from banks are relegated to higher cost and variable rate credit cards, not term loans.
  • 95% of the small business loans in CA from JPMorgan Chase Bank are credit card loans. While credit cards serve a purpose, they can come with higher costs, variable rates and are not well suited for the longer term capital needs that many businesses have.
  • Dodd Frank Section 1071 data would bring much needed transparency into who is receiving small business loans- and who is not. In the same way that HMDA data created greater transparency in the home lending market, 1071 small business data will shed light on small business lending trends, highlight disparities, and likely lead to increased lending.
  • Fintech, online, and marketplace lenders can present opportunity, but some are clearly also creating harm. CDFIs and community lenders are spending precious capital and staff time refinancing small business owners out of predatory fintech loans and merchant cash advances.
  • An Opportunity Fund analysis of 150 “alternative loans” found an average APR of 94%, and among Hispanic borrowers, the average monthly payment was more than 400% of take-home pay.
  • Advocates are concerned about a weakening of consumer protection under any OCC national fintech charter which will lead to preemption of state laws, and are concerned that the OCC has not shown itself to be a strong bank regulator (see, Wells Fargo).
  • We join Congressman Cleaver in raising concerns that fintech lenders are violating fair lending laws by not making good credit available to neighborhoods of color, that fintech algorithms may be biased, and that predatory fintech loans are destabilizing small business owned by women and people of color. The CFPB and other agencies must vigorously enforce fair lending laws against predatory and discriminatory fintech lenders. Bank partnerships with fintech lenders must be thoroughly scrutinized to ensure fair lending and consumer protection laws are followed
  • In addition to bank and fintech loans, small businesses are vulnerable to high cost products like Merchant Cash Advance and installment loans that can financially sink business owners instead of helping them.


Home loans are hard to come by in neighborhoods of color. Banks are increasingly focused on making jumbo loans which disproportionately benefit white borrowers, while making fewer loans to Latino and African American borrowers, and abandoning FHA loans in favor of their own, unproven products, with less than impressive results.

  • Any future GSE reform must maintain a duty to serve communities and retain affordable housing goals. Currently, Fannie and Freddie need to be held accountable to meeting ambitious affordable housing goals, and should offer more flexible products to qualified homeowners.
  • We are concerned about a return to redlining, and hope to see DOJ, CFPB and HUD continue their important work in enforcing fair housing and fair lending laws.
  • HUD is currently investigating CRC’s first HUD redlining complaint (more information and graphs below), filed against OneWest Bank for having few branches and making few home loans in neighborhoods of color in six Southern California counties.
  • Given our aging population, increased oversight is needed in the reverse mortgage market to ensure that seniors are not taken advantage of by loan originators and servicers.
  • CRC is deeply concerned that seniors are continuing to lose their homes unnecessarily due to servicer bureaucracy, a lack of strong oversight of this industry by HUD, and a very limited infrastructure to help seniors and their families avoid needless foreclosures.  The elimination of funding for Legal Aid organizations will exacerbate this problem.

Affordable Rental Housing

California continues to suffer from an affordable housing crisis. The California Housing Partnership Corporation estimates that California needs 1.5 million affordable homes to accommodate the state’s lowest income residents.

  • Any HUD budgets cuts to key programs such as HOME, CDBG, Rental Assistance and Low Income Housing Tax Credits, could be devastating.
  • California nonprofit housing developers report that many investors, including banks subject to the Community Reinvestment Act, are pulling back from existing commitments in tax credit deals and attempting to renegotiate terms in light of pending tax reform. The result is fewer units produced and more subsidy coughed up at the 11th hour by desperate nonprofits who then must forego developer fees, and local governments which must contribute additional, unplanned subsidies.
  • Banks should receive CRA rating downgrades for such behavior as well as for seeking community development lending credit for loans that foreseeably lead to displacement of low and moderate income residents the CRA was meant to benefit.
  • CRC is deeply concerned about Fannie Mae’s recent commitment to guarantee up to $1 billion in debt backed by single family rental homes owned by private equity giant Blackstone.
  • Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac must continue to invest in the National Housing Trust Fund and Capital Magnet Fund.
  • Importantly, HUD must continue to implement Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing obligations and assist local jurisdictions in meeting critical housing needs, fighting displacement and creating access to areas of opportunity for all.

Immigrant Access

The current political environment, with its changing policies and harsh rhetoric is threatening to drive immigrant communities out of the country, or out of sight. A recent CRC survey of confirms that many of our organizational members are seeing clients go underground, fail to show up for jobs, and forego access to needed services because they are concerned about ICE.

  • Bank regulators and banks should work together to clarify and simplify the privacy data rights of immigrants so they will not fear that banks will share their private data with the government.
  • Banks should also be encouraged to lend directly to qualified immigrant homeowners and small business owners who may have ITIN numbers, as well as invest in CDFIs and community lenders that make such loans.
  • For banks serving large immigrant populations, they should consider what information may be helpful to share with their customers about power of attorney and other bank access issues should a household member face deportation.

Payday lending

Payday lending continues to be a scourge on working families, charging 400% APR for short term loans that trap unsuspecting consumers in cycles of debt.

  • The CFPB has designed well considered and reasonable rules to protect consumers against abuses.
  • Federal intervention is needed as payday lenders and lobbyists have a stranglehold in Sacramento.
  • Banks should be incentivized to continue to develop small dollar alternatives to such products and to assist CDFIs and other community lenders that seek to fill this niche, and should also be penalized in their CRA exams for any financing to high-cost, predatory lenders.


According to the CFPB, the majority of overdrafts are on transactions of $24 or less and are repaid within 3 days or less. The CFPB calculated that with a median overdraft fee of $34, this is equivalent to a loan with a 17,000 APR.

  • It is telling that payday lenders defend their triple digit APR loans by saying consumers are merely making informed decisions to take out payday loans because they are less expensive than overdraft fees.
  • Banks continue to overly rely on overdraft fees as a source of fee revenue, to the detriment of their clients. CFPB rules on abusive overdraft policies are important, and all regulators should independently examine the impact of overdraft on bank customers, and work with their banks to end this product.


More on CRC’s Redlining Complaint Against CIT Group

Redlining Complaint Against OneWest Bank filed by California Reinvestment Coalition

Mortgage lending in 2015 (CRC)

The complaint alleges that OneWest Bank’s lending to borrowers in communities of color is low in absolute terms, low compared to its peer banks, and is lower than one would expect, given the size of the Asian, African American and Latino populations in Southern California.

Branch locations OWB

As part of the complaint, an analysis of the bank’s assessment areas found that OneWest has only 1 branch in an Asian majority census tract, no branches in African American majority census tracts, and 11 branches in Hispanic majority census tracts.

Branches in Asian, African American, and Hispanic majority trats (OWB)

While OneWest’s foreclosure record is not part of the redlining complaint, analysis by CRC and Urban Strategies Council found that OneWest was nine times as likely to foreclose in communities of color as compared to extending mortgage loans in communities of color.

OWB foreclosures vs originations

Is Personal Insurance Federation of California Lobbying Against COIN Transparency?

COIN image 1

Earlier today, 18 prominent California nonprofits called on the Personal Insurance Federation of California to support transparency in a key insurance reinvestment program- the California Organized Investment Network.

Similar to the Community Reinvestment Act for banks, COIN is an avenue for insurance companies (who collect over $250 billion in premiums from California consumers every year) to invest in California communities- especially low income communities.

COIN was created in 1996 as an alternative to legislation that would have mandated a CRA type requirement on insurance companies.  However, the program is set to expire in January 2017.

AB 2728, (Atkins) would reauthorize COIN, however, the current version of the bill doesn’t include the “data call” which is the mechanism requiring insurers to report on their investments in California communities (or lack thereof).

In response, 18 organizations sent a letter to Speaker Emeritus Atkins, urging her to include the data call in AB 2728.

You can read more about COIN and the data call here: Nonprofit Leaders Call on Insurance Lobbying Group to Support Transparency in COIN Reinvestment Program

You can also read an OpEd about COIN and the importance of the data call here: Insurance Industry Happy to Receive, But Not to Give




The CFPB’s Impact in California

Have you heard? Yesterday was the 5th anniversary of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.  In that short time, the agency has built a reputation for dramatically increasing transparency into the financial services market, leveling the playing field between consumers and financial corporations, and putting bad actors on notice that they will face consequences.

bday cake

Senator Elizabeth Warren is widely credited with the idea of an agency that would stand up for financial consumers, and the CFPB was included in the Dodd Frank financial reform that was passed in response to the mortgage meltdown.

While advocates had repeatedly warned federal and state regulators and elected officials about the predatory mortgages that were being made, these warnings fell on deaf ears.


Predatory loan advertising

In the summer of 2013, CRC and our allies urged the US Senate to confirm Richard Cordray as director of the CFPB and we were happy to see that he confirmed on July 16, 2013.

CFPB confirm!

CRC and our allies delivering over 25,000 petitions from Californians, urging the US Senate to confirm Richard Cordray.

Since then, Cordray and his CFPB colleagues have been busy!

In an April snapshot about California and complaints submitted by Californians, the CFPB reported:

1) As of April 1, 2016, Californians had submitted 118,900 of the total 859,900 complaints the CFPB had received at that point, or about 14%.

2) Complaints from Los Angeles and San Francisco accounted for nearly 50% of these complaints.  (CRC won’t claim credit for all of the San Francisco complaints, but we receive a fair amount of phone calls from harmed consumers and we frequently suggest making a complaint to the CFPB if it is accepting complaints for that particular product.  Not only does this hopefully lead to redress for the affected consumer, but it also helps the CFPB to see if there are concerning trends- for example if a lot of consumers are complaining about a particular company or product).

3) Speaking of “lots of complaints about a particular product,” mortgages were #1 most complained about product in the April snapshot, accounting for 32% of complaints.  In fact, complaints from California were more likely to be about mortgages as compared to the number of complaints made about mortgages at the national level (about 26%).

4) Debt collection was also frequently complained about, representing 24% of all California complaints, as compared to 26% nationally.

5) Most complained about companies: The CFPB received the most complaints from California consumers about Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Experian.

We’re including five examples of how the CFPB has stood up for consumers below:

1) Stopping Illegal Harassment of Payday Loan Borrowers: The CFPB has stopped companies from engaging in illegal and predatory behavior- like Ace Cash Express illegally harassing their customers into rolling over their payday loans. In announcing the settlement, Director Cordray explained: “This culture of coercion drained millions of dollars from cash-strapped consumers who had few options to fight back.”   Take a look at this graphic from the CFPB’s settlement with Ace Cash Express.  It’s from their new employee training manual and provides a clear diagram on how Ace tried to keep its borrowers caught in the payday loan debt trap:

ACE Cash Express

2) Targeting Enablers Too: The CFPB doesn’t just target bad actors, it also targets companies that enable bad actors- like this California based lead generator (D and D Marketing, doing business as T3Leads (T3)) that sold consumer loan applications as “leads” to small-dollar lenders. The CFPB explained that “T3 failed to vet or monitor its lead generators and lead purchasers, exposing consumers to the risk of having their information purchased by actors who would use it for illegal purposes. T3 allowed its lead generators to attract consumers with misleading statements and took unreasonable advantage of consumers’ lack of understanding of the material risks, costs, or conditions of the loan products for which they apply. T3’s conduct was unfair and abusive….”

To understand why online lead generators can be so bad for customers, take a look at this NPR Story: I applied for an online payday loan: here’s what happened next.

3) Loan Modification Scam Artists: In some ways, California was ground zero for the mortgage meltdown, especially since many of the most predatory lenders (like Countrywide) were headquartered in Southern California.  Since the mortgage meltdown, more bottom-feeding vultures have emerged, preying on desperate homeowners with promises of costly loan modifications that never materialize.  In July 2014, the CFPB, FTC, and state regulators announced a sweep against these scam artists.  The Bureau filed three lawsuits against these companies and individuals who had collected more than $25 million in illegal fees for services that were never delivered.  California was also “well-represented,” with a number of these scam artists located in our state. The CDPB’s complaint alleged that one of these firms,  Clausen, Cobb, and CCMC “managed, staffed, and supported the deceptive loan modification operations of Stephen Siringoringo’s southern California law firm. The State Bar of California initially referred the misconduct to the CFPB.”

4) Predatory Mortgage Loan Servicing: The CFPB hasn’t only gone after scam artists- it’s also worked to stop companies who are cutting corners and hurting their customers in the process.  One such company is Ocwen, a mortgage loan servicer.  In 2013, the CFPB announced a $2 billion settlement against Ocwen for “systemic misconduct at every stage of the mortgage servicing process.”  The settlement also covered homeowners with loans from Litton (a servicer formerly owned by Goldman Sachs who had also received low marks for the way it treated its customers) and Homeward Residential Holdings LLC (formerly American Home Mortgage Servicing Inc.).

5) Protecting Mortgage Customers: During the “Wild West” days of mortgage lending leading which later caused the mortgage meltdown, lenders routinely rewarded their staff members for putting customers into more expensive mortgages.  Surprisingly, this practice was allegedly still in place at RPM Mortgage, according to a 2015, $19 million settlement with the CFPB.

If you’d like to learn more about the CFPB, check out these resources:

Consumers Count: Five years standing up for you

CRC Hosts CFPB Mission District Tour on Small Business Displacement

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Liana Molina discusses displacement of local small businesses at the corner of 16th and Valencia in the Mission District, San Francisco

Yesterday, CRC hosted a visit and tour by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) in the Mission District in San Francisco.  CFPB Director Richard Cordray and Assistant Director Grady Hedgespeth met with local small business owners and leaders from CRC member organizations including MEDA, Opportunity Fund, and Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center who support small businesses with capital and technical assistance.

Displacement in the Mission

In the past few years, growth in the tech sector has created enormous pressure not just on housing rents in the Bay Area, but on commercial rents as well.

The displacement of neighborhood serving small businesses in the Mission is especially troubling, given the critical role they play in supporting, serving and employing longtime residents of the Mission.  Small business owners have also complained about difficulty they face in obtaining bank loans, and research by CRC confirms that small business lending by the five largest banks has dropped dramatically since the recession.

Under the Dodd-Frank financial reform, the CFPB is charged with collecting data about small business lending.  In February this year, the CFPB announced that writing these rules is considered a near term priority goal. Similar to the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, these new rules are expected to increase transparency (and accountability) about who is getting small business loans- and who isn’t.

Small business owners share their experiences and challenges

Director Cordray and Assistant Director Hedgespeth met with several of these small business owners during the CFPB’s visit.  The first stop on the tour was Venga Empanadas, where co-owner Pablo Romano shared his experience in obtaining financing to open his restaurant.  Denied financing by a bank, Mr. Romano connected with Opportunity Fund, a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) who provided him with a $45,000 loan, enabling him to sustain and grow his business which now has eight employees.


Luisa Estrada, owner of D’Maize Restaurant and Catering speaks with Director Cordray.

Next, Zenaida Merlin and Luis Estrada, owners of D’Maize Restaurant and Catering, shared how a small business loan of $80,000 from Mission Economic Development Agency’s (MEDA) new CDFI Adelante loan fund meant that D’Maize was recently able to expand their business to a full-service restaurant.  They now employ 22 people from the local community.

Elsa Valdez, the owner of El Salvador Restaurant, explained how she benefitted from working with MEDA, who helped her to get a loan from KIVA to help pay for improvements to her restaurant, which has been family owned for over 20 years.  Ms. Valdez wants to continue improvements to the restaurant and growing her business.


Paula Tejada, owner of Chile Lindo Delicatessen and Coffee Shop

Paula Tejada, known as “The Girl from Empanada” is the owner of Chile Lindo Delicatessen and Coffee Shop, a business she first purchased in 1995.  Working with Renaissance Entrepreneur Center, she received technical assistance on running her business, including their 14 week business planning class focused on marketing, management, operations and finance.

Lunch at San Jalisco

The tour concluded with lunch at San Jalisco, owned by Dolores “Josie” Padilla-Reyes.  She took over the restaurant from her parents in the 1970s, but after rent was increased threefold, she had to close the café and reopen the eatery in its current location.  Concerned about being displaced again, she worked with the Mission Economic Development Agency (MEDA) to secure a loan to purchase her building, preventing further displacement.

Len Rogers, the owner of the Electric Bicycle Superstore, also joined the lunch.  He launched his small business in 2008 and it has grown steadily since then.  Len was denied by multiple banks for credit, making him a perfect target for expensive merchant cash advance companies. After struggling with unsustainable payments required by multiple predatory finance companies, he connected with Opportunity Fund, who refinanced him into an affordable, responsible small business loan.  Len was also a client of Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center, who helped him get a KIVA loan and provided consulting services through their Bayview Office.


The lunch concluded with a “Happy Birthday” cake presented to the CFPB staff, since yesterday was the Bureau’s fifth birthday. In that short time, the agency has secured over $11 billion in relief for over 27 million consumers and handled nearly 1 million complaints.

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