The New CFPB Rule is a Testament to the Power of Community Organizing

Seniors were the largest age group of payday loan borrowers in California last year but a new CFPB rule will better protect borrowers.

Dear CRC Supporter:

Yesterday, the CFPB released a new rule that will protect working families from predatory loans and the financial heartaches they create.

This rule is a victory and is a testament to the power of community organizing by CRC, our members and our allies. Borrowers will benefit from new safeguards requiring lenders to better assess their ability to repay a loan and from restrictions preventing lenders from making multiple, unsuccessful attempts to debit their bank accounts, a practice that results in costly overdrafts and closed bank accounts.

As the CFPB began its work to write this rule, CRC members and their clients courageously stepped up to share their experiences. Working with our partners, we organized listening sessions with the CFPB and with our Congressional representatives where Californians talked about how they got caught in the payday loan debt trap- a cycle of costly rollovers that are profitable for the industry, but that extract precious income and assets away from working families.

California Consumer Leadership Academy

In 2015, CRC partnered with CRL-California and California LULAC to organize the first ever California Consumer Leadership Academy.  Eight courageous women participated in this day-long training, shared their experiences, and crafted strategies on how to stop predatory lending practices in our communities.

At the CFPB’s field hearing where it announced its draft proposal of the rule, I shared the story of a Santa Cruz borrower who had worked with a CRC member after getting a payday loan and then being illegally harassed for repayment of it. We applauded the CFPB’s initial proposal, while also highlighting where we thought the safeguards could be stronger.

Once the public comment period opened, we activated consumers, CRC members and allies, and engaged with local, state, and federal elected officials to ensure the rules were as strong as possible. Consumers shared their stories in the media and we helped them to file CFPB complaints. Local mayors voiced their support. As a result of CRC and our member’s organizing efforts, the LA County Board of Supervisors passed a unanimous motion in support of strong rules. California state legislators, as well as our two senators and more than half of our congressional delegation (led by Representative Maxine Waters) weighed in with their support.

Over 100 California nonprofits also weighed in with the CFPB and our message was loud and clear: California families need a strong CFPB rule that protects their income and assets from predatory lenders.

We applaud the CFPB for its thoughtful approach to this rule and we want to extend our gratitude to our members and allies who worked tirelessly to organize and to protect our communities from predatory lending. We’re also grateful to the Silicon Valley Community Foundation for their support of this work.

We anticipate the industry will attempt to get this rule overturned- either through the courts or the Congressional Review Act, but rest assured we will continue our advocacy in support of this rule and the other work the CFPB is doing to stand up for Main Street.

My statement on the rules is now available on CRC’s website and you can read a CFPB fact sheet about the rules here.

Thank you for your support.

Paulina Gonzalez

Executive Director

CRC’s Response to the New Threats Facing our Communities

Dear CRC Members and Supporters,

Like you, we were shocked and saddened by the violence and hatred demonstrated by white supremacists and neo-Nazis chanting anti-Semitic and racist chants in Charlottesville, culminating with the murder of Heather Heyer, a nonviolent protester. We were horrified to watch the president refuse to condemn the violent perpetrators and instead equate the actions of those who espouse hate with those who resist it. It was heart wrenching and rage inducing. Like many of us, I found it difficult to sleep that night. I found solace at church the next day when my pastor compelled us to keep our eyes on the prize through our sorrow and anger.

Today, I write to you to remind us to collectively keep our eye on the prize. CRC staff are working hard in this moment not just to respond, but to build; and to do it in greater partnership with our coalition members. We know our communities need our members and our work more than ever. While the forces in power are trying to drive us further into the margins, we are pushing back and are determined to do all we can to achieve our vision of a fair and inclusive economy that puts the needs of communities of color and low income communities at the center.

Thankfully, the five-year strategic plan that our board, members, and staff helped build a year and a half ago continues to give us the vision and structure to work toward our five strategic goals: holding financial institutions and regulators accountable to the needs of our communities, building economic opportunity, protecting and building family and household wealth, building people power through community engagement, and deepening and broadening our impact.

Since the election, the communities we serve are experiencing unprecedented pressures that threaten their financial health and stability. The race baiting, fear mongering, and overt racism we saw on the campaign trail is now a policy agenda. It is reflected in the proposal to build a wall, the Muslim Ban, attacks on affirmative action, dramatically increased detentions and deportations, proposed budget cuts and weakening of rules at HUD, a proposed ban on transgender people serving in the military, attempts to disenfranchise people from voting, and the attacks against the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA), our two strongest tools that ensure that all communities have access to safe and transparent credit and financial products that help build wealth.

A recent report from the Treasury Department outlined this administration’s goals to relax banking safeguards and to modernize the CRA. We will work to ensure that any CRA modernization plans do not entail weakening the law or reducing investment in California’s communities. CRC will also continue our work to preserve the common-sense safeguards that were implemented under Dodd-Frank to prevent another Great Recession.

While CRC will continue our CRA accountability work, I also want to update you on how we’re responding to these new threats.

CRC is Responding.

At three emergency summits that we co-hosted with the Greenlining Institute after the election, we heard concerns from our members and allies in Fresno, Los Angeles, and San Francisco about this administration’s approach to housing, its attacks on immigrants and people of color, and how local and state governments will need to step up and fill in the void at the federal level. Service providers also raised the need for dramatically increased organizing and advocacy.

CRC is taking these challenges head on. Our organizational mission, vision, and strategic plan call for no less. As the current administration further attempts to divide our country and marginalize the most vulnerable among us, we will fight back and work even harder with you to bring our communities together and to advance our shared goals in the following ways.

Resisting Economic Displacement: CRC is working with our local partners and members to fight displacement of low-income communities and communities of color in the East Bay, with a special focus on the mechanics of how this is happening, including who is financing this activity, and how we can stop it.

Protecting Immigrant Financial and Economic Resources: Next month, we will release the results of a survey of our members that reveals how their immigrant clients are being impacted, including some who have even gone “underground” in response to this new climate of fear.

We are also building from the momentum of a sold-out, standing room only symposium we co-hosted in March for front line providers in the East Bay focused on financial resources for immigrant families. CRC will be engaging with immigrant families and the service providers they trust to understand the unique financial and economic challenges they’re facing, and to identify and expand access to resources that can help, starting with better banking practices.

Making Government a Force for Good, not Harm: Many families are being ensnared in debt traps created both by government fines and fees and the abusive debt collection practices used to collect on them. The lack of income to pay a parking or traffic ticket can quickly spiral out of control into mounting debt, ruined credit, driver’s license suspension, job loss, criminalization, and incarceration. We believe now more than ever, local and state governments need to stand up on behalf of working families, not against them. We’ll be engaging in this new area of work with our California members and allies, and also with our long-term partners in three states: North Carolina, Illinois, and Maryland.

CRC stands in solidarity with our members, partners, and allies, and we will continue to advocate for policies that support communities of color and working families, and against policies that would cause them harm.  In what often feels like dark times, we are keeping our eyes on the prize, with the belief that together in struggle we can and will prevail.

We appreciate your support and I welcome your feedback.

In solidarity,

Paulina Gonzalez

Executive Director

The California Reinvestment Coalition

CRC Speaks about Small Biz Owners and Financing Challenges at CFPB CAB Hearing

Paula

Paula Tejada, owner of Chile Lindo, speaks to CFPB Director Cordray and Assistant Director Grady Hedgespeth about being a small biz owner in the Mission District of San Francisco. Learn about the CFPB’s tour here.

Today, Paulina Gonzalez, the executive director of the California Reinvestment Coalition, will be speaking at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Consumer Advisory Board meeting about the challenges that Small Business owners face in obtaining safe, transparent loans to start and grow their businesses.  CRC is strongly supportive of the CFPB’s effort to implement the 1071 data collection called for under the Dodd Frank financial reform bill.

Gonzalez’ presentation highlights how loans to smaller small banks have decreased; how small business owners are being pushed to credit cards (instead of small business loans); and how some predatory lenders are filling in the gaps.

CRC has been monitoring access to loans for small business owners in California for a number of years, and the results have been especially disappointing:

2007-2009: According to CRC’s analysis and report (The Little Engine that Could), SBA lending to California’s minority-owned businesses dropped by 81 percent for African American-owned businesses and 84 percent for Latino-owned businesses. See report: Small Business Access to Credit

2007-2013: According to CRC’s analysis of SBA data, small business lending, especially to African Americans and Latinos dropped dramatically from 2007 to 2013.

Report Finding Include:

Bank Loans Guaranteed by the U.S. Small Business Administration Fall Dramatically:

  • There was a 60% drop in the number of small business loans made from FFY 2007 to FFY 2013.
  • In FFY 2013, only 2% (96 loans) of SBA 7a loans were made to businesses owned by African-Americans, 11% to Latinos (634 loans), and 14% to women (846 loans).
  • Credit needs of the smallest small businesses are being ignored: the average SBA 7a loan tripled in size from $165,723 in 2007 to $498,971 in 2013.

Conventional Small Business loans decline for 4 of the 5 largest banks

  • For conventional small business loans, four of the five major banks decreased the amount of loans they were making in 2012 by about 2/3 as compared to 2007 in five key counties (Alameda, Fresno, Los Angeles, Sacramento and San Diego).
  • US Bank increased its overall small business lending by more than 17% in these counties, while JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, and Citibank all made far fewer loans in 2012.

Practitioners Report Difficulties in Getting Loans, Esp. for Smallest Businesses 

  • CRC polled our member organizations who work directly with small businesses. Seventy-three percent of respondents stated that banks are doing less lending to small businesses (revenue of less than $1 million annually) in 2013 than 2012.
  • Ninety-two percent of them stated that banks are not doing significant lending at the $150,000 or less level.

Watch a Screening of “The Ordinance” with Stop the Debt Trap LA on Feb 22nd

Join Stop the Debt Trap LA on Wednesday, February 22nd from 2 – 4 pm for a screening of “The Ordinance” documentary film, followed by a short campaign briefing and planning meeting. the-ordinance

With billionaires, racists and Wall Street executives running the country, our communities are especially vulnerable.

Come learn more about how we’re organizing locally to shore up protections for consumers and communities against predatory lenders.

“The Ordinance” is a new short film focused on the fight to reform predatory lending in Texas, and the role that local communities, faith leaders and policy makers played in putting out the “not welcome” mat to financial predators in their community.

Much like in California, the Texas legislature is partial to the payday loan industry, and legally allows for abusive triple-digit interest rate lending. In Texas and in California, communities are fighting back and organizing to pass local policies in their cities to stop the growth of these industries and send a strong message to state and federal policy makers that enough is enough!

Come learn more about the local movement against predatory payday and car title lenders, and how you can get involved in our advocacy campaign!

Light refreshments will be provided.

Please RSVP either on CRC’s Facebook page, or by emailing Liana Molina.

If you have any questions or would like more information, contact Liana at liana@calreinvest.org

You can watch the trailer for the movie by clicking here.

New Payday Loan Facts in California

Did you hear that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is finalizing rules for high-cost payday, car title, and installment loans?

If you’re curious to know more about these loans, and the impact they have (mostly negative) on Californians and our state economy, then you’ll want to read CRC’s new fact sheet on payday lending in California.

It includes the latest data from the California Department of Business Oversight, as well as research on the negative drag to California’s economy created by payday loans.

california-payday-loan-brochure

 

 

You can download the fact sheet by clicking here.

If you want to learn more about payday loans in California- and the work the California Reinvestment Coalition is doing to take on predatory lending, click here and visit the CRC website.

Celebrate Sacramento Reinvestment 2016

At our Celebrate Sacramento Reinvestment event held in September 2016, CRC awarded Raise the Wage Sacramento its Community Heroes of the Year award.

Raise the Wage Sacramento is a grassroots coalition of workers and community organizers, whose fight at the local level was instrumental to the Governor’s passage of the statewide $15 minimum wage this past April.

Building on the Fight for 15 campaign led by local fast food workers, the coalition’s success at mobilization and public actions created for elected leaders an undeniable mandate to raise the minimum wage. While our country grapples with a national solution to address growing income inequality, Raise the Wage Sacramento is inspiring evidence of true grassroots power and leadership in the struggle for working people in every state.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CRC congratulates our honorees, and thanks our many sponsors for the event, whose sponsorship helps CRC to achieve our vision of an inclusive and fair economy that meets the needs of communities of color and low-income communities by ensuring that banks and other corporations invest and conduct business in our communities in a just and equitable manner.

California Lawmakers Call on CFPB for Stronger Payday Lending Rule

Payday Lenders

Have you heard?  After decades of abusive lending practices by payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders, a federal agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) will be releasing a new rule to better protect borrowers who use these loans.

The Center for Responsible Lending (CRL) and California Reinvestment Coalition (CRC) applauded California members of the U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, California State Legislature, city and county officials, and California Attorney General Kamala Harris who all sent official statements to the CFPB, calling on the bureau to strengthen an earlier, draft version of the rule.

In their letters, California lawmakers and attorney general highlighted that the proposed rule is a step in the right direction, but  that more needs to be done to ensure borrowers are not trapped in a cycle of debt by these predatory loans.

In California, payday lenders typically charge 366% APR on a $300, two-week loan.

Payday lenders and high cost lenders are also offering loans of $2,500 and above at 100% or higher  APRs. Consumers are especially vulnerable to this abusive practice as California does not have an interest rate cap for loans greater than $2,500.

“As elected representatives, we respectfully urge the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to issue a strong federal payday lending rule that puts an end to the payday, car title, and high-cost installment loan debt trap nationwide” the legislators wrote.

“These high-cost unaffordable loans are detrimental to any community, but have a disproportionate impact on our African American and Latino neighborhoods. In California, payday lenders are twice as likely to be located in communities of color than in white communities, even after accounting for income. The core principle of CFPB’s proposal is the right approach—requiring lenders to ensure that a loan is affordable without having to re-borrow or default on other expenses. However, some of the details must be strengthened in order for this approach to truly work and protect Californians from predatory lenders.”

Payday lenders have invested in efforts to ward off state laws and federal regulations that would protect consumers. Some members of the California State Legislature, including California Assemblyman Ian Calderon (District-57) have pushed to weaken regulations against payday and car title lenders by calling on the CFPB to go light on rules that prevent abusive financial practices.

“This rule will create the first nationwide regulatory floor for the payday lending industry, while maintaining the prerogative of states to further strengthen their consumer protection laws and regulations as they see fit.” the attorney general wrote. “I strongly support the Bureau’s proposal to require a meaningful “ability-to-repay” standard and to curb collection abuses, as well as its proposals for structural protections to help protect consumers from being trapped in long-term, unaffordable debt.”

“Payday and car title lending significantly harm borrowers and their families. They lead to financial consequences, such as bank penalty fees, loss of cars, and bankruptcy. It’s discouraging to see that some members of the state legislature have aligned themselves with payday lenders instead of putting the interests of California families first.” explained Center for Responsible Lending Director of California Policy Graciela Aponte-Diaz. “We commend the members and the attorney general for their leadership and standing up against the payday lending industry.”

“For years, payday lenders have siphoned money out of the pockets of Californians who can least afford it,” said California Reinvestment Coalition Director of Community Engagement Liana Molina. “We applaud our state elected officials for standing up for responsible lending and we join them in urging the CFPB to finalize a rule that will protect borrowers.”

California state legislative members who signed the comment letter were:

Senators Bob Wieckowski, Mark Leno, Senator Fran Pavley, Hannah-Beth Jackson, Mike McGuire, Benjamin Allen, and Carol Liu; and Assembly Members Mark Stone, Patty Lopez, Philip Ting, Susan Talamantes Eggman, and Susan Bonilla.

The following local policymakers also called for a stronger payday lending rule:

Berkeley City Councilmember Jesse Arreguin, Menlo Park Mayor Rich Cline, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaff, San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, Roseville Mayor Carol Garcia, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, San Mateo County Board of Supervisors President Warren Slocum, and Santa Clara County Supervisor Ken Yeager.

Additionally, U.S. Representative Maxine Waters led a group of more than 100 Congressional members in sending a comment letter to the CFPB Director calling for a stronger payday lending rule.

The California Congressional delegation members who signed the comment were: Peter Aguilar, Karen Bass, Xavier Becerra, Ami Bera, Judy Chu, Mark J. DeSaulnier, Anna G. Eshoo, Sam Farr, John Garamendi, Janice Hahn, Mike Honda, Jared Huffman, Barbara Lee, Ted W. Lieu, Zoe Lofgren, Alan Lowenthal, Lucille Roybal-Allard, Linda T. Sánchez, Jackie Speier, Mark Takano, Juan Vargas, and Maxine Waters.

Both U.S. Senators from California, Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, have also signed on to a letter urging CFPB for a stronger rule.

CRL and CRC have consistently fought against abusive predatory lending practices across California. Recently, CRL and CRC sent comments to CFPB calling for the Bureau to end the payday lending debt trap and close off paths to evasion for predatory payday lenders. Read CRL’s letter here and CRC’s letter here.

As part of its rulemaking process, CFPB released its proposed rule on June 2, 2016, and has since received public comments from families, communities, and organizations. The final day for public comment was on October 7, 2016. The CFPB is expected to make its final decision on the regulations in 2017.