The New CFPB Rule is a Testament to the Power of Community Organizing

Seniors were the largest age group of payday loan borrowers in California last year but a new CFPB rule will better protect borrowers.

Dear CRC Supporter:

Yesterday, the CFPB released a new rule that will protect working families from predatory loans and the financial heartaches they create.

This rule is a victory and is a testament to the power of community organizing by CRC, our members and our allies. Borrowers will benefit from new safeguards requiring lenders to better assess their ability to repay a loan and from restrictions preventing lenders from making multiple, unsuccessful attempts to debit their bank accounts, a practice that results in costly overdrafts and closed bank accounts.

As the CFPB began its work to write this rule, CRC members and their clients courageously stepped up to share their experiences. Working with our partners, we organized listening sessions with the CFPB and with our Congressional representatives where Californians talked about how they got caught in the payday loan debt trap- a cycle of costly rollovers that are profitable for the industry, but that extract precious income and assets away from working families.

California Consumer Leadership Academy

In 2015, CRC partnered with CRL-California and California LULAC to organize the first ever California Consumer Leadership Academy.  Eight courageous women participated in this day-long training, shared their experiences, and crafted strategies on how to stop predatory lending practices in our communities.

At the CFPB’s field hearing where it announced its draft proposal of the rule, I shared the story of a Santa Cruz borrower who had worked with a CRC member after getting a payday loan and then being illegally harassed for repayment of it. We applauded the CFPB’s initial proposal, while also highlighting where we thought the safeguards could be stronger.

Once the public comment period opened, we activated consumers, CRC members and allies, and engaged with local, state, and federal elected officials to ensure the rules were as strong as possible. Consumers shared their stories in the media and we helped them to file CFPB complaints. Local mayors voiced their support. As a result of CRC and our member’s organizing efforts, the LA County Board of Supervisors passed a unanimous motion in support of strong rules. California state legislators, as well as our two senators and more than half of our congressional delegation (led by Representative Maxine Waters) weighed in with their support.

Over 100 California nonprofits also weighed in with the CFPB and our message was loud and clear: California families need a strong CFPB rule that protects their income and assets from predatory lenders.

We applaud the CFPB for its thoughtful approach to this rule and we want to extend our gratitude to our members and allies who worked tirelessly to organize and to protect our communities from predatory lending. We’re also grateful to the Silicon Valley Community Foundation for their support of this work.

We anticipate the industry will attempt to get this rule overturned- either through the courts or the Congressional Review Act, but rest assured we will continue our advocacy in support of this rule and the other work the CFPB is doing to stand up for Main Street.

My statement on the rules is now available on CRC’s website and you can read a CFPB fact sheet about the rules here.

Thank you for your support.

Paulina Gonzalez

Executive Director

New Payday Loan Facts in California

Did you hear that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is finalizing rules for high-cost payday, car title, and installment loans?

If you’re curious to know more about these loans, and the impact they have (mostly negative) on Californians and our state economy, then you’ll want to read CRC’s new fact sheet on payday lending in California.

It includes the latest data from the California Department of Business Oversight, as well as research on the negative drag to California’s economy created by payday loans.

california-payday-loan-brochure

 

 

You can download the fact sheet by clicking here.

If you want to learn more about payday loans in California- and the work the California Reinvestment Coalition is doing to take on predatory lending, click here and visit the CRC website.

California Lawmakers Call on CFPB for Stronger Payday Lending Rule

Payday Lenders

Have you heard?  After decades of abusive lending practices by payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders, a federal agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) will be releasing a new rule to better protect borrowers who use these loans.

The Center for Responsible Lending (CRL) and California Reinvestment Coalition (CRC) applauded California members of the U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, California State Legislature, city and county officials, and California Attorney General Kamala Harris who all sent official statements to the CFPB, calling on the bureau to strengthen an earlier, draft version of the rule.

In their letters, California lawmakers and attorney general highlighted that the proposed rule is a step in the right direction, but  that more needs to be done to ensure borrowers are not trapped in a cycle of debt by these predatory loans.

In California, payday lenders typically charge 366% APR on a $300, two-week loan.

Payday lenders and high cost lenders are also offering loans of $2,500 and above at 100% or higher  APRs. Consumers are especially vulnerable to this abusive practice as California does not have an interest rate cap for loans greater than $2,500.

“As elected representatives, we respectfully urge the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to issue a strong federal payday lending rule that puts an end to the payday, car title, and high-cost installment loan debt trap nationwide” the legislators wrote.

“These high-cost unaffordable loans are detrimental to any community, but have a disproportionate impact on our African American and Latino neighborhoods. In California, payday lenders are twice as likely to be located in communities of color than in white communities, even after accounting for income. The core principle of CFPB’s proposal is the right approach—requiring lenders to ensure that a loan is affordable without having to re-borrow or default on other expenses. However, some of the details must be strengthened in order for this approach to truly work and protect Californians from predatory lenders.”

Payday lenders have invested in efforts to ward off state laws and federal regulations that would protect consumers. Some members of the California State Legislature, including California Assemblyman Ian Calderon (District-57) have pushed to weaken regulations against payday and car title lenders by calling on the CFPB to go light on rules that prevent abusive financial practices.

“This rule will create the first nationwide regulatory floor for the payday lending industry, while maintaining the prerogative of states to further strengthen their consumer protection laws and regulations as they see fit.” the attorney general wrote. “I strongly support the Bureau’s proposal to require a meaningful “ability-to-repay” standard and to curb collection abuses, as well as its proposals for structural protections to help protect consumers from being trapped in long-term, unaffordable debt.”

“Payday and car title lending significantly harm borrowers and their families. They lead to financial consequences, such as bank penalty fees, loss of cars, and bankruptcy. It’s discouraging to see that some members of the state legislature have aligned themselves with payday lenders instead of putting the interests of California families first.” explained Center for Responsible Lending Director of California Policy Graciela Aponte-Diaz. “We commend the members and the attorney general for their leadership and standing up against the payday lending industry.”

“For years, payday lenders have siphoned money out of the pockets of Californians who can least afford it,” said California Reinvestment Coalition Director of Community Engagement Liana Molina. “We applaud our state elected officials for standing up for responsible lending and we join them in urging the CFPB to finalize a rule that will protect borrowers.”

California state legislative members who signed the comment letter were:

Senators Bob Wieckowski, Mark Leno, Senator Fran Pavley, Hannah-Beth Jackson, Mike McGuire, Benjamin Allen, and Carol Liu; and Assembly Members Mark Stone, Patty Lopez, Philip Ting, Susan Talamantes Eggman, and Susan Bonilla.

The following local policymakers also called for a stronger payday lending rule:

Berkeley City Councilmember Jesse Arreguin, Menlo Park Mayor Rich Cline, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaff, San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, Roseville Mayor Carol Garcia, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, San Mateo County Board of Supervisors President Warren Slocum, and Santa Clara County Supervisor Ken Yeager.

Additionally, U.S. Representative Maxine Waters led a group of more than 100 Congressional members in sending a comment letter to the CFPB Director calling for a stronger payday lending rule.

The California Congressional delegation members who signed the comment were: Peter Aguilar, Karen Bass, Xavier Becerra, Ami Bera, Judy Chu, Mark J. DeSaulnier, Anna G. Eshoo, Sam Farr, John Garamendi, Janice Hahn, Mike Honda, Jared Huffman, Barbara Lee, Ted W. Lieu, Zoe Lofgren, Alan Lowenthal, Lucille Roybal-Allard, Linda T. Sánchez, Jackie Speier, Mark Takano, Juan Vargas, and Maxine Waters.

Both U.S. Senators from California, Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, have also signed on to a letter urging CFPB for a stronger rule.

CRL and CRC have consistently fought against abusive predatory lending practices across California. Recently, CRL and CRC sent comments to CFPB calling for the Bureau to end the payday lending debt trap and close off paths to evasion for predatory payday lenders. Read CRL’s letter here and CRC’s letter here.

As part of its rulemaking process, CFPB released its proposed rule on June 2, 2016, and has since received public comments from families, communities, and organizations. The final day for public comment was on October 7, 2016. The CFPB is expected to make its final decision on the regulations in 2017.

Los Angeles County Takes Stand Against Predatory Payday, Car Title, Installment Lending Practices, Urges Strong CFPB Rules

Editor’s note: If your organization would like to support strong consumer protections being included in the new CFPB rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans, please contact Liana Molina (liana AT calreinvest.org) at CRC and she can help.  The deadline to give your feedback is approaching fast- it’s October 7, 2016!

On Thursday, September 8th, the Chair of the LA County Board of Supervisors, Hilda L. Solis, hosted a press conference with LA community leaders where she talked about the financial harms caused by predatory payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans.

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(Photo credits: Supervisor Solis' office, LULAC, Samuel Chu, and CRC)

LA County Motion

At the press conference, Supervisor Solis announced an LA County motion in support of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) implementing strong federal rules to better protect consumers from harmful lending practices by payday, car title, and high cost installment lenders. The motion was approved unanimously the following week, making Los Angeles County the largest county in California (and the US) to pass a motion supporting strong rules by the CFPB to better protect consumers from predatory lending.

Supervisor Solis explained: “This motion is an important way for the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to demonstrate that we believe protecting families and their pocketbooks is good public policy and that we strongly support the CFPB finalizing a rule that will prioritize borrowers over ill-gotten profits.”

Community Leaders

Rabbi Joel Thal Simonds, associate program director at the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, opened the event. He explained: “The words of Exodus 22:24 remind us that ‘If you lend money to My people, to the poor among you, do not act toward them as a creditor; exact no interest from them.’ We seek a just and caring society in which those in need are not set on downward spiral of debt and hopelessness. That is why we must stop the abusive practice of payday lending which profits off the hardships of those living paycheck to paycheck. ”

Borrowers Discuss Their Experiences

During the press conference, former payday loan consumers also spoke about their experience with the so-called “payday loan debt trap.”  The “debt trap” refers to the fact that most payday loan borrowers are unable to repay their first loan when it comes due two weeks after they got it. So, they are forced to roll over or renew the loan, often multiple times, and they are paying an average APR in California of 366% when borrowing these loans.

Christina Griffin explained:

“When I had a financial emergency, I thought I could use a payday loan once and be done with it. Instead, I couldn’t pay back the loan two weeks later- and also be able to pay my other expenses. So, I had to keep rolling over my payday loan- which meant more and more fees and less money for other things- like groceries. As a former customer who survived the “debt trap,” I’m urging the CFPB to put a stop to this “debt trap” for future borrowers.”

Rosa Barragán shared her story of getting caught in a long term cycle of payday loan debt when she took out a loan following the passing of her husband.  You can read more of her story in La Opinión’s article about the press conference: Exigen mano dura para las compañías de ‘payday loans’.

rosa-barragan-photo-credit-chair-solis-office

Rosa Barragan speaking

Pit of Despair Art Installation

In addition to the press conference, a visually stunning, life-sized 3D art installation, the “Pit of Despair” was unveiled.  It was created by an artist named Melanie Stimmel and the team at We Talk Chalk, and it is a graphic illustration of how payday lending really works. The interactive art display has traveled around the country to visually demonstrate the “debt trap” that the majority of payday loan borrowers find themselves in when they are unable to make a balloon payment to repay their loan two weeks after they receive it. As a result, most borrowers renew their loans repeatedly (incurring more charges each time), which has been labeled the “payday loan debt trap.”

Putting finishing touch on Pit of Despair- thanks Americans for Financial Reform!

Putting finishing touch on Pit of Despair- thanks to Americans for Financial Reform for sharing it!

The Negative Impact of Payday Loan Stores in Los Angeles
Los Angeles County is home to approximately 800 payday loan storefronts, by far the most of any county in California. Because of the structure and terms of payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans, they worsen the financial position of most borrowers. Research has found that lenders are disproportionately located in communities of color, and are a net drag on the overall economy.

Bill Allen, CEO of the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation, explained the impact  of payday loan fees recently in an LA Daily News OpEd:

“These “alternatives” drain low-income residents’ scant savings. More than $54 million in check-cashing fees and $88 million in payday loan fees each year are paid by county residents. If those consumers had better financial services options, much of that $142 million could go toward building household savings, thus increasing economic stability for their families and communities.”

Gabriella Landeros from the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor explained: “Working families deserve better than the harmful financial products peddled by these lenders, and we join the LA County Board of Supervisors in urging the CFPB to finalize and enforce a strong rule to protect consumers.”

Liana Molina, director of community engagement at the California Reinvestment Coalition, helped organize the event and coordinated with the StopTheDebtTrap team at Americans for Financial Reform to bring the “Pit of Despair” art installation.  She explained:

“The payday loan industry advertises their loans as quick, one-time “fix” for a financial emergencies. In reality, these loans are designed to do the opposite. The majority of borrowers will end up renewing their loans repeatedly and incurring huge fees every time they do so. The CFPB can stop this “debt trap cycle” by implementing a strong rule that would require lenders to underwrite these loans, to determine that borrowers have the ability to repay without having to re-borrow or default on other expenses.”

CRC extends a big thank you to the organizations that made the event possible:

East LA Community Corporation (ELACC),

LULAC – California,

New Economics for Women (NEW),

Mexican American Opportunity Foundation (MAOF),

Montebello Housing Development Corporation (MHDC),

Consumer Action,

Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO,

Labor Community Services, AFL CIO,

Pacific Asian Consortium in Employment (PACE),

Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON),

Multi-Cultural Real Estate Alliance for Urban Change,

Thai Community Development Center (Thai CDC),

Haven Neighborhood Services,

Korean Churches for Community Development (KCCD),

Koreatown Youth and Community Center (KYCC),

Public Counsel,

Religious Action Center for Reform Judaism, and

VEDC

Additional Background on the Impact of Payday Loans in California 

While fourteen states and the District of Columbia have interest rate caps of about 36% APR or less, California law allows for two-week, $300 payday loans at 459% APR interest.

The California Department of Business Oversight recently released two reports on payday lending, and car title and high cost installment loans.

A few stats are included below:

1) Total Number of payday loans: Approximately 12.3 million payday loans were made in California in 2015 and the aggregate dollar amount of the payday loans was about $4.2 billion.

2) Average number of loans and average APRs: The average number of payday loans per customer was 6.5, paying an average APR of 366% (a 5% increase from 2014).

3) Repeat borrowers and “churning” of loans: Contrary to loans being advertised as a “one time fix for emergencies,” 64% of fees in 2015 ($53.53 million) – came from customers who had seven or more payday loan transactions during the year.

Advance America Payday Lender Settlements

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

As the payday, car title, and installment loan industry is trying to fight the upcoming CFPB regulations, one of the claims they try to make is that store-front locations offering loans are far more legitimate and far less likely to take advantage of customers as compared to online lenders. We’ll agree that online lenders are also shady (read our post here:  8 Reasons Not to Get an Online Payday Loan)

Let’s examine this claim that storefront lenders are less shady.  First, it’s impossible to ignore the predatory rates they charge their customers, and the fact that 4 out of 5 of their customers are forced to renew their loans because the loan repayment terms are unrealistic.  These loans are allowed to be offered this way in many states because the industry has been so prolific at bribing…er…investing…er….making campaign contributions to state legislators who write the rules.  And, the industry has a well-documented history of using questionable smear tactics to defeat state legislation that would better protect consumers.

Put aside their bad products that are legal but predatory, and let’s move onto the claim that all storefront payday lenders follow the rules.  It turns out, that’s not the case either.  In fact, some car title, and instalmment lenders also don’t follow state laws, and as a result, are forced to settle with regulators and with attorneys who sue them.

In our first edition of “Payday Lender Law Breakers,” we’ll take a look at Advance America and its checkered history of settlements.

Shark payday 2

 There’s been a lot of them, so if we missed one, let us know in the comments section!

2015: State of Pennsylvania $22 million settlement: According to Lancaster Online, under this settlement, Advance America will pay $8 million in restitution, forgive unpaid balances of about $12 million, and pay another $2 million to the state for legal costs in administering the settlement.  Read more here: Payday lender Advance America to return $8M to Pa. consumers in settlement

2010: Missouri: Advance America agrees to settlement worth at least $5.8 million in cash and debt forgiveness to a class of Missouri residents.  Read more here: Payday Lender To Shell Out $6M In Class Settlement

2010: North Carolina: Advance American agrees to $18 million settlement in North Carolina: Read more here: Payday Loan Lawsuit Brings $18 Million Settlement Against Advance America

2010: South Carolina: Advance America part of $2.5 million lawsuit in South Carolina against payday lenders. Read more here: Payday Loan Class Action Settlement

2009 California: State of California Dept. of Business Oversight Settlement: In 2008 the Department conducted regulatory examinations of various Advance
America locations.  The examinations cited purported violations of the CDDTL, including that Advance America allegedly collected excess amounts from customers that made partial payments on their loans, allegedly collected NSF fees on returned checks that were deposited after customers made partial payments on their loans, allegedly failed to refund finance charges to customers that paid off their loans the next business day following origination, and allegedly conducted deferred deposit transactions at an unlicensed location (hereinafter collectively “Exam Findings”). Advance America disputes and denies the Exam Findings.  Read more here: State of California Settlement Agreement and Desist and Refrain Order

2009: Georgia Settlement: Press release: Advance America Announces Settlement in Georgia and the Closing of 24 Centers in New Hampshire

2009 Arkansas Settlement: Read more here:  http://www.stoppaydaypredators…

 

CRC resources on predatory payday, car title, and installment lending

Share Your Story about payday, high cost installment, or car title lending- It only takes 3-5 minutes. By sharing your experience, you can help take a stand against predatory lending and help the CFPB understand why consumers need strong rules to limit predatory loans.

Editorials Against Payday Lending Newspapers around the country are weighing in!  Check out this extensive compilation of 109 editorials (and counting!) against the debt traps created by payday and other high cost loans:

Payday Lender Hall of Shame: If you thought payday lenders are here to help, read this shocking expose of their worst practices.  Some truly shocking behavior!

North American Title Loans Repossess Car from Injured Consumer.  Watch this PBS NewsHour segment about TJ McLaughlin, whose car was repossessed after he couldn’t make payments because of a health problem.

Share Your California Payday Loan and Car Title Loan Stories

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

Have you ever used a payday, car title, or other high-cost consumer loan?

Have you heard the news?

A federal agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is designing new rules to better regulate companies who make car title, payday loan, and other high-cost consumer loans.

CRC’s executive director, Paulina Gonzalez, testified at the CFPB hearing where the proposed rules were announced.

This hearing was only the first step, and the industry is already fighting back against common-sense protections.

If you have used one of these loans in the past, consider sharing your story with CRC as we advocate for common-sense consumer protections in the new rules.

Take a look and share your story:  Share Your Story to Ensure Strong Consumer Protections.

8 Important Points from the CFPB Field Hearing on Payday Lending in Richmond Virginia

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

 

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

Did you miss the CFPB hearing on payday and other high cost loans?  Not to worry, advocates and consumers from around the country testified at the hearing about their experiences with payday and car title loans and we’ve got the highlights below!

1) Ending predatory lending is a top priority of the CFPB and of President Obama: President Obama signaled the importance of putting an end to predatory lending in a speech he gave Thursday in Birmingham, saying, “As Americans, we don’t mind folks making a profit,” Obama said. “But if you’re making that profit by trapping hardworking Americans in a vicious cycle of debt, then you need to find a new business model. You need to find a new way of doing business.”

Watch President Obama’s speech here (payday lending starts at about 15 minutes in):

 

2) When consumers share their stories about payday and car title loans, it isn’t pretty:

ELLIOTT CALLOUT EMAILIt started with a broken ankle and a $500 payday loan. It ended in a three-year ordeal that cost Elliott – a Marine Corps veteran – his wife, and five daughters more than $30,000 and their house…read more here from the PICO National Network.

From a Guardian article about hearing: “I would tell anyone at this point: don’t do it. Do not do it. If I had known what I know now about payday loans, I never would have looked their way,” he said.   The Guardian: Payday loan borrowers: ‘When are we going to be done paying these people?’

Consumers also shared their experiences during the public comment period- below are retweets about the stories:Car Title borrower

payday borrower

New Economics For Women shared a consumer story that illustrates how the debt cycle works:

When Lorena (Alias), of Los Angeles, CA, found herself in a tight financial spot, she turned to payday lending….She visited a Speedy Cash location in Los Angeles, CA and borrowed $255, paying $45 in fees and hoping to be able to pay it back in two weeks time….Unfortunately, that was not enough time for her to stabilize her finances, and she had to repeat the loan. She has now repeated the loan 7 times, paying $315 in fees alone….Not only has she had to pay the added $315, she has also acquired overdraft fees. On five occasions, Speedy Cash has taken the money out of her bank account while she was still waiting on disability checks to come in, adding $175 to her expenses, due to payday lending….Hoping to catch up on some of her expenses and be able to get rid of the initial payday debt, she took out a second loan at Speedy Cash for $2,600. However, that loan did not help her at all and has instead dragged her deeper into the cycle of debt. In addition to the repeat loans every two weeks, Lorena now has to pay $38 every two weeks to repay the $2,600 loan. She has fallen behind on her bills and rent and has reached out to family and friends for help. Currently she owes Speedy Cash $2,755 and can only see that amount growing as time goes by.

3. Besides personal stories, research on payday and car title loans has found the products are toxic for the majority of people who use them- pushing them deeper into a cycle of debt.

From a new Pew research report on car title loans:

  • Between 6 and 11 percent of title loan borrowers have a car repossessed annually.
  • To repay a title loan, 47 percent report using a cash infusion, such as a tax refund.
  • 66% of car title borrowers believe the industry should be more regulated.

4. Advocates and practitioners advocate based on the stories and experiences of the people they work with:

Adam Rust, Research Director at Reinvestment Partners, spoke about his organization’s work in housing counseling and providing free tax preparation services.  He agreed that they see people facing difficult financial situations, but explained that paydayloans won’t right the ship- instead they’ll only cause people more hardship.

Paulina Gonzalez, executive director of the California Reinvestment Coalition explained in her testimony that “in many of our communities, we need more income, not just credit.”

5. People across the country are concerned about high cost lenders trying to use loopholes to escape regulations- or using cash to wield influence:

NC AFL CIO

lobbyists

6. While the industry tried to play the “we create jobs card” it turns out that’s not true either:

According to a report from the Insight Center for Community Economic Development, the payday loan industry was responsible for a net loss of over 14,000 jobs in 2011, and a net economic loss of over $750 million.  Bankruptcies that are triggered by payday loans were responsible for another $169 million net economic loss.

7. States like North Carolina and New York that got rid of payday lenders don’t want them back.  

Carlene McNulty, an attorney from the North Carolina Justice Center, commented that North Caorlina had kicked payday lenders out ten years earlier- and the state doesn’t want them back.

NY payday loans8. Communities notice where payday loan companies locate their stores- and where they don’t:

Where do payday lenders locate

 

Want to learn more about payday and car title loans?  We have a few resources:

1.Over 70 editorials have been written about payday lending- Has your local newspaper written one yet? Take a look: Editorials against payday lending  

2. Ever wonder why people are concerned about payday loans and some of the companies that make them?  Is it the high interest rates? The debt traps they create for their customers?  Their shady collection tactics?  The amount of money they spend lobbying state legislators in order to protect their profits instead of their customers? Maybe it’s the extra fees they don’t disclose? All of the above?  Check out the Payday Lender Hall of Shame.

3. It’s not just payday loans that can be dangerous to your health- it’s also high cost car title loans and high cost installment loans too: Careful! Alternatives to Payday Loans Can Also Be Predatory

4. Thinking about an online payday loan?  Here’s 8 strong reasons not to! (hint: if you don’t like having your identity stolen, steer clear!)  8 Reasons Not to Get an Online Payday Loan