California Payday Lending Statistics

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

payday lender vultures

Payday and Car Title Lending Statistics

Payday Lending is a $135 million net drain on California’s economy each year: Despite industry claims about creating jobs, a 2013 report from the Insight Center for Community Development estimates the payday lending industry subtracts 1,975 jobs from California’s economy each year, and is a net loss to the state economy of over $135 million annually.

Nationally, four out of five payday loans are rolled over or renewed: Countering industry claims about payday loans as being useful for “one-time emergencies,” a study by the CFPB found that 4 out of 5 payday loans are rolled over or renewed within two weeks, adding to concerns about the high-cost “debt traps” created by these loans.

California consumers pay over $507 million in payday loan fees annually and $239 million in car title fees: A new report from the Center for Responsible Lending finds that consumers pay $239,339,250 in fees for car title loans and $507,873,939 in payday loan fees, ranking California as the #2 state for highest amount of fees paid for car title and payday loans.

More than 15,591 Californians had cars repossessed in 2014 because of car title loans: According to the California Department of Business Oversight, the charge-off rate for auto title loans in 2014 was 4.5 percent. (17,633 of 394,510).  At the national level, recent research from the CFPB found that 1 in 5 car title borrowers will have their car repossessed.

Do these facts concern you?  There is a KEY opportunity to weigh in with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as it finalizes rules to regulate payday, car title, and installment lenders. Please share your stories and comments here: CFPB comment.

Learn more about payday lending by visiting CRC’s website.

Would Postal Banking Be Better than Payday Loans?

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

Earlier this week, Liana Molina, director of community engagement at the California Reinvestment Coalition, testified at a field hearing held by the Grand Alliance to Save Our Public Postal Service.  The alliance is focused on  “the choice now facing the U.S. Postal Service: Build on the heritage of universal, nationwide service and expand to meet the needs of the hi-tech economy and low-income communities – or continue to shrink with declining service, facility closings and job cuts.”

USPS picture

Molina’s testimony focused on a proposal for the USPS to complete with fringe, predatory payday, car title, and other high cost lenders by instead offering safe, low-cost financial services.  Her testimony is included below.

Good evening, my name is Liana Molina. I’m the Director of Community Engagement at the California Reinvestment Coalition (CRC). The California Reinvestment Coalition is a statewide, membership based organization working to build a fair and inclusive economy that meets the needs of communities of color, low-income communities, and others who have been marginalized and historically underserved.  We use strategic advocacy that leads banks and other corporations to provide investments and financial services that expand access to housing that is affordable, entrepreneurial opportunities, good jobs, and other tools to create and sustain household and community wealth.

Historically CRC has advocated for greater transparency and accountability of the banking industry, and we’ve pushed banks to grow and strengthen their community reinvestment lending, services and investments in low-income communities across California. Today we continue our work to expand access to fair and affordable banking, credit and other financial services and opportunities for underserved consumers.

I lead CRC’s Stop the Debt Trap campaign to reform high-cost payday, car title and installment lending practices. We are employing a multi-pronged approach that entails legislative and regulatory advocacy at the local, state and federal level. Before I delve into the specific policy reforms we are seeking and how the US Postal Service can play an important and impactful role in the struggle against predatory lending, let me share why we got involved in the fight to end predatory payday lending.

Our efforts against predatory payday lending stem from our work to change and improve the mainstream banking sector.

Did you know that every single payday loan borrower is also a bank customer? A consumer needs to have an active checking account in order to obtain a payday loan, since the loan is secured with a post-dated check which is then deposited by the lender on the consumer’s next pay date.

So these consumers are not entirely unbanked. These are people who likely use their bank accounts for direct deposit of their income and to handle other basic financial transactions, such as paying regular bills. Yet, these consumers cannot borrow a $300 or $500 loan from their bank because the banks do not make small dollar loans that meet the credit needs of their clients. So this is one way the banks are part of the problem.

Additionally, many of the big banks are actually invested in payday loan corporations through extending lines of credit they provide to payday lenders, which enable payday lenders to conduct their business. So while the banks aren’t making affordable small dollar loans directly to their customers, they have major credit agreements with payday lenders who then charge these same customers triple-digit interest rates on short-term loans. Banks involved in financing high-cost, low-quality lending through lines of credit and term loans to payday loan corporations include Wells Fargo, Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase, US Bank and others.

Finally, CRC has prioritized our Stop the Debt Trap campaign to end predatory consumer lending because when we talk about the provision of financial services in low-income communities, many economically disadvantaged neighborhoods do not have access to full service bank branches. Instead, these neighborhoods are saturated with fringe financial entities such as check cashers, pawn shops and payday loan outlets, all of which strip the income and assets of consumers struggling to make ends meet. We also know that payday loan stores are more likely to be located in African-American and Latino neighborhoods than in white neighborhoods.

Given this landscape, there is room for a lot of improvement in how our financial system meets the credit and capital needs of low and moderate-income consumers. While CRC agrees that there is a legitimate need for access to credit, debt trap products like payday, car title and installment loans (which are basically payday loans on steroids) do not help people over the long-term.

Payday Lenders

In California, the interest rate on a two-week, $300 payday loan is 459% APR. It amounts to $15 per $100, or $45 to borrow $255. It may not seem so bad at the face value, and most consumers can afford to pay $45 for a $255 loan. However, payday loans require a balloon payment of the full $300 at the borrower’s next pay date, two-weeks later. Most borrowers do not have $300 to pay off the debt without having to re-borrow. So unless the borrower has an increase in their income or a decrease in their expenses, in 4 out of 5 cases, they will take out another loan in order to meet their basic expenses for the next two weeks. This cycle repeats itself an average of 7-10 times for consumers, and drains Californians of over $578 million in interest and fees, annually.

High-cost car title and installment lending is growing in California. Now that the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is poised to issue rules on payday lending, more payday lenders are moving into these other loan products that are just as dangerous. Our state doesn’t regulate the interest rates on payday loans below $300 or on consumer loans above $2,500. We are seeing more car title loans at interest rates at around 100% APR and longer-term installment loans with interest rates at 200% or higher. For example, one borrower working with us on the campaign paid $6,700 over 24 months for a $2,529 car title loan at 112.47%. It’s outrageous.

CRC and other consumer groups have been advocating for changes to local and state laws to rein in these predatory lending practices for many years, and it has been an uphill battle. One of our greatest challenges is the lack of wide-scale alternatives available on the market. Many of our policy makers accept predatory lending as a necessary evil, because they claim that their constituents need access to these loans, and the banks are not lending.

Do you see where I’m going with this?

This is where the concept of postal banking could really make a tangible difference in providing an accessible, responsible, affordable alternative loan product to consumers. The US Postal Service already provides some financial services, such as money orders, cashing of treasury checks, international paper and electronic money orders and gift cards. There is tremendous potential to expand the products and services offered by the USPS to meet the financial needs of underserved populations. We recognize that moving the postal service into offering consumer loans is a long-term process, not an immediate step. However, given the huge demand for small dollar consumer loans, it is a vision that is worth working toward.

When CRC learned about the Campaign for Postal Banking, we were excited to learn that a national coalition has come together to advocate for the USPS to act immediately to expand and enhance existing products and services. While the creation of small dollar lending and savings programs would necessitate Congressional legislation, the USPS could begin to build on the financial products and services currently offered. For example, the postal service could start cashing payroll checks, it could install surcharge-free ATMs in post office lobbies to enable recipients of public benefits to access their funds without paying fees, and it could introduce bill payment and electronic fund transfer services.

By providing less expensive financial products and services, the USPS could help improve the financial stability of millions of Californians. A postal banking system would not only benefit consumers who do not have access to mainstream financial institutions, it would also provide a sorely needed alternative to the big banks who wrecked our economy with predatory mortgage lending and then exploited tax payers by receiving trillion dollar bailouts.

We know that a public banking option is possible. The United States had a Postal Savings System from 1911-1967, which at its peak held about 10 percent of assets in the entire commercial banking system. Today, 1.5 billion people worldwide receive some financial services through their postal service in countries like the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and Japan. Posts around the world have demonstrated the feasibility of successfully providing financial services, increasing financial inclusion and generating revenue for the postal service.

We believe this is possible in the United States, and it will require our persistent advocacy and campaigning to bring about these types of changes. CRC is optimistic about the current dialogue around postal banking, and we look forward to participating in local, regional and statewide efforts to move this conversation forward. We greatly appreciate the work of A Grand Alliance to Save Our Public Postal Service and the Campaign for Postal Banking.

Thank you for the opportunity to testify.

 

Testimony from California Reinvestment Coalition on Consumer Loans

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

On January 11th, the California Assembly Committee on Banking and Finance held a hearing, “Small Dollar Consumer Lending in California.”

Paulina Gonzalez’ testimony is featured in its entirety below.  After reading her testimony, you may also be interested in seeing CRC’s other resources on payday lending, linked below.  Want to join the conversation and share your experience? Visit #StopTheDebtTrap on Twitter and join the conversation!

Paulina Gonzalez Testimony on Small Dollar Consumer Lending

I am the Executive Director of the California Reinvestment Coalition.  We are a statewide financial and economic just coalition with over 300 organizational members across the state.  I know firsthand the needs of our communities, not only from the work that I do and the communities that CRC represents, but I know this because this is the community that I come from.  I grew up in working class south Montebello, in an immigrant family where we struggled to make ends meet.  But luckily for us, we never had the option of taking out a payday or installment loan that would have left us in a worse situation.

CRC’s members work on the front lines of California’s low income communities and communities of color.  Our members are affordable housing developers, CDFI small business lenders, asset building organizations, and tenant rights organizations.

Our membership serves the constituencies that are the target of the aggressive marketing and outreach efforts of high cost lenders, and they are located in low income communities where payday loans and installment loan store fronts are heavily concentrated.  They serve the constituency that therefore often fall prey to these high cost products.

The lobbyists and corporate executives of the predatory lending industry say that they know our community needs and that they our providing a service with their products by helping families during an emergency when they can’t pay their rent or when their car breaks down.  They say that they provide a last ditch option when our communities have no other option.

But really the so called service they are offering is analogous to offering a starving man poisoned food.

These products leave families in a worse situation than when they started; they leave families thousands, if not tens of thousands of dollars in debt paying 100-500% above the principle over the term of a loan.

CRC agrees with the general goal and principal of expanding access to credit for our communities, particularly for under-served populations, however we want to ensure that the credit that is being offered is fair, affordable, responsible credit, not high-cost predatory loans that trap borrowers in a cycle of debt.

We do not believe that high cost credit, in other words, that poisoned food, is the solution for our communities.

We are concerned about the weak legislative and regulatory framework governing payday lending below $300 and car title and installment lending over $2,500.  The failure to regulate this lending space at each end of the lending spectrum allows for lenders to conduct high cost predatory lending with impunity in this space.

At one end of the spectrum, in the under $300 range you have unregulated interest rates and APRs as high as 450% on these loans.  In addition, you have a business model that relies on repeat borrowing.  The CFPB just last year took an enforcement action against ACE Cash Express, one of the largest payday lenders in the country. They found that ACE used illegal debt collection tactics – false threats of lawsuits or criminal prosecution – to pressure overdue borrowers into taking out additional loans they could not afford.  This is the profit making model these lenders rely on, as evidenced by their employee training manual.

On the other end of the spectrum, in the above $2,500 range, the business model is based on triple digit interest rates that force consumers into loans that can take a decade to pay off and can cost tens of thousands of dollars above the original loan cost.

Imagine paying $30,000 on a $5,000 loan.  Does that sound like a service to you? Or does that sound like poisoned food?

Consumers in the middle lending space, that encompasses the pilot program, have the most protections.  There is a usury cap, some underwriting, and there is reporting to credit agencies.

What we should be discussing is strengthening the middle lending space, extending the protections of the pilot to more people by regulating the $300 payday lending space and the above $2,500 lending space.

Our  current concern with each end of the lending spectrum is that lenders are offering these products without assessing the consumer’s ability to repay, thereby forcing consumers to choose between re-borrowing, defaulting, or falling behind on other obligations, we are also concerned about certain payment collection practices that can subject consumers to substantial fees and increase risk of bank account closure.

Consumers need better protections for consumer loans, across the board, from payday to car title to installment loans, such as:

  • underwriting requirements that take into account income and expenses to ensure borrowers have the ability to repay the loan
  • interest rate restrictions and fee caps of 36% APR or less
  • protections against expensive, long-term debt such as limits on re-borrowing and refinancing

We’re encouraged by the forthcoming CFPB rule and we are working hard to win strong reforms and establish a national floor for consumer protections, we believe it’s premature to change the CFLL, given the impending changes in federal regulatory requirements.

If the legislature is going to proceed anyway, the focus should be on regulating each end of the lending spectrum and leveling the lending playing field to protect consumers from high cost predatory loans and therefore expanding access to responsible affordable credit.

CRC resources on predatory payday, car title, and installment lending

Share Your Story about payday, high cost installment, or car title lending- It only takes 3-5 minutes. By sharing your experience, you can help take a stand against predatory lending and help the CFPB understand why consumers need strong rules to limit predatory loans.

Newspapers around the country are weighing in!  Check out this extensive compilation of 109 editorials (and counting!) against the debt traps created by payday and other high cost loans: Editorials Against Payday Lending

Payday Lender Hall of Shame: If you thought payday lenders are here to help, read this shocking expose of their worst practices.  Some truly shocking behavior!

North American Title Loans Repossess Car from Injured Consumer.  Watch this PBS NewsHour segment about TJ McLaughlin, whose car was repossessed after he couldn’t make payments because of a health problem.

 

North American Title Loans Repossesses Car from Injured Customer

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

 

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

How does the debt trap work?

Watch this PBS NewsHour episode about T.J. McLaughlin, who had to take some time off work after a medical problem.  Short on money for bills, he borrowed $1,200 from a car title lender (North American Title Loans), at 300% interest rate.  But when he lost his job and was unable to make the payments on this loan, they took his car.

If you’re in California and have had a similar experience with car title, payday lender, or high-cost installment loans, please share it with CRC (Click on this link to share your story- it only takes 3 minutes).

The CFPB (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau) is writing rules about high-cost payday, car title, and installment loans. By sharing your experience, you can help the CFPB understand how to make these products safer.  Ultimately, that can mean fewer people going through financial heartaches like the one TJ McLaughlin experienced.

Here’s 7 Reasons Payday Lenders Are Worried About Their Profits

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

Payday Pay to Play

1. They’re spending a LOT of money on politicians BUT money can’t always buy you love

The payday lending industry has always “invested” gobs of money in politicians and elected officials as a way to fight off state-level regulation.  According to a new report from Americans for Financial Reform, the industry must be really worried. They spent over $15 million in campaign contributions during the 2013-14 campaign cycle. Some notable recipients include Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz from Florida who received $31,250.  Wasserman Schultz later signed onto a letter with her Florida colleagues, suggesting that the CFPB shouldn’t make payday lending rules too restrictive.  In response, more than 20 Florida organizations that actually work with people who use payday loans (and see the damage caused by them), wrote a letter to the Florida delegation, reminding them that contrary to the marketing of these loans, the reality is that 63% of payday loan customers in Florida take out 12 or more loans each year.

 2. Regulators are clamping down on their illegal practices:

“A huge payday lending operation based in Kansas City will be banned from offering any more loans under a $54 million settlement announced by federal regulators Tuesday.”  Firms accused of faking loans, draining bank accounts settle with feds

“The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is suing the NDG Enterprise, a complex web of commonly controlled companies, for allegedly collecting money consumers did not owe. According to the agency’s complaint, the defendants illegally collected loan amounts and fees that were void or that consumers had no obligations to repay, and falsely threatened consumers with lawsuits and imprisonment.”  Offshore payday lender hit with CFPB lawsuit

And, World Acceptance, one of the shadiest lenders out there, also recently shared that the CFPB is investigating it: This Payday Lender Is Being Investigated by the CFPB, and the Stock Got Crushed

3. People don’t like payday loans, in fact, 75% of people want stronger regulation of them.

The more that people learn about payday loans, the more they support regulation of them.  For example, a recent survey by the Pew Charitable Trusts finds that 75% of respondents believe there should be more regulation of payday loans.  This is an increase from 72% of respondents surveyed in 2013.
Did we mention that there have been 95 newspaper editorials written AGAINST payday lending in the past year and a half?

 

4. The gloves are off in exposing payday loan financiers

 The HuffingtonPost broke the story that a new project run by Allied Progress will expose secrets of the payday lending industry- and who profits from it:

“We’re going to do the hard work to expose who these people are and their links to some big corporations and individuals who would prefer to stay in the shadows,” said Frisch. “We’re looking at all types of predatory lending, payday loans, car titles, check cashing, bank fees. Nothing is off the table, both nationwide and in the states, if we see that we can make an impact.”

Read more here: New Project Seeks To Unmask Shadowy Payday Lenders

Another excellent resource for unmasking the folks that profit off of the payday loan debt trap and other shady companies is a website created by Unite Here, called “Loan Shark Funds”, nicknamed after the “Lone Star Fund” that is investing in payday lenders like DFC Global, which it purchased in December 2014.

Take a look: LOAN SHARK FUNDS website:

Lone Shark Funds

5. Companies are heading for the exit doors

Some companies like EZ Corp are seeing the writing on the wall.  The more people learn about payday, car title, and high cost installment loans, the less they like them.  The company announced in July 2015 that it is no longer going to originate payday, car title, or high cost installment loans.

6. Payday Money = Dirty Money  (can somebody please tell the politicians?)

Money made off of putting people in a payday loan debt trap is dirty money.  Take a look at this private school that announced it was returning donations from a payday loan company that is part of a settlement with federal authorities.

7. Banks don’t want to aid and abet this predatory profit model anymore

In this case, it’s a bank in Australia: “Westpac pulls out of funding payday lenders

According to a recent report from our allies Reinvestment Partners, (Connecting the Dots: How Wall Street Brings Fringe Lending to Main Street) there’s still some banks in the US that are willing to fund payday lenders.

Some of the largest banks include:

Wells Fargo ($WFC)

Bank of America ($BAC)

US Bank ($USB)

Capital One ($COF)

Read the report to see more excellent graphs and information like this one:

Wells Fargo Funding High Cost Consumer Loans

 

Did you like this post?   Check out a few of our other most popular payday lending posts:

95 Editorial Against Payday Lenders

CFPB Field Hearing in Richmond, Virginia Summary

The Payday Lender Hall of Shame

 

How Californians Are Working to #StopTheDebtTrap created by Payday and other High Cost Loans

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

 

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

Earlier this year, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced  new federal rules under consideration for payday, car title and other high cost consumer installment loans.

Paulina Gonzalez, Executive Director of the California Reinvestment Coalition attended the CFPB’s field hearing in Richmond, Virginia, where the draft proposal was unveiled. Gonzalez testified on the consumer panel about the need for federal reforms.

Back in California, CRC members and our allies have been busy organizing to support rules with strong consumer protections that must require lenders to assess borrowers’ “ability to repay” before extending them a loan. If you are an organization that’s interested in getting involved, please contact CRC’s payday organizer, Liana Molina: liana@calreinvest.org.

If you’re a consumer, please consider sharing your story with payday loans in our short survey.  Sharing your story can be an important way to help clean up this industry!

Some pictures from our work during the past few months are included below.

In October, community advocates sponsored and organized a Southern California Payday Reform Strategy Convening in Los Angeles to discuss the current state of payday lending, the proposed CFPB rules, and the impasse for consumer protection legislation in Sacramento. The picture below is Representative Maxine Waters, Ranking Member of the House Financial Services Committee along with Hernan Vera, who was president of Public Counsel at the time of the convening.

Payday Loan convening

In December, the Coalition Against Payday Predators, a coalition CRC belongs to, held a rally at a payday loan store in San Jose.  Representative Zoe Lofgren spoke at the rally, as did Dr. Emmett Carson, the founding CEO of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

 

Rep. Zoe Lofgren speakout against payday loans

In April, CRC partnered with CRL-California and California LULAC to organize the first ever California Consumer Leadership Academy.  Eight courageous women participated in this day-long training, shared their experiences, and crafted strategies on how to stop predatory lending practices in our communities.

California Consumer Leadership Academy

LA and Bay Area Trainings on CFPB proposed rules and filing complaints. In April and May, CRC organized two trainings, titled: “”Winning and Defending Strong CFPB Rules to End High-Cost Debt Traps” where we worked with local service providers to explain the CFPB proposal, the importance of it, and how to file CFPB complaints with or on behalf of the consumers they work with.

April Training in San Francisco at Mission Economic Development Agency

Stop The Debt Trap

May Training at the Community Center at Sol Y Luna Apartments, in partnership with the Center for Asset Building Opportunities and the East LA Community Corporation

Stop the Debt Trap LA

The picture below is of CRC, CRL-California and National Council of La Raza staff  at the NCLR Latino Policy Summit, where we presented on the status of payday lending in California and the current CFPB rule making process. CRC also presented at the Housing Rights Center Summit in Los Angeles and Housing California’s conference in Sacramento.

Stop the Debt Trap NCLR

Finally, CRC has been leading the charge in organizing our members and partners in outreach, education and advocacy work with members of Congress representing various congressional districts across the state. The CFPB will need strong political support to propose, enact and defend strong consumer protections.

8 Important Points from the CFPB Field Hearing on Payday Lending in Richmond Virginia

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

 

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

Did you miss the CFPB hearing on payday and other high cost loans?  Not to worry, advocates and consumers from around the country testified at the hearing about their experiences with payday and car title loans and we’ve got the highlights below!

1) Ending predatory lending is a top priority of the CFPB and of President Obama: President Obama signaled the importance of putting an end to predatory lending in a speech he gave Thursday in Birmingham, saying, “As Americans, we don’t mind folks making a profit,” Obama said. “But if you’re making that profit by trapping hardworking Americans in a vicious cycle of debt, then you need to find a new business model. You need to find a new way of doing business.”

Watch President Obama’s speech here (payday lending starts at about 15 minutes in):

 

2) When consumers share their stories about payday and car title loans, it isn’t pretty:

ELLIOTT CALLOUT EMAILIt started with a broken ankle and a $500 payday loan. It ended in a three-year ordeal that cost Elliott – a Marine Corps veteran – his wife, and five daughters more than $30,000 and their house…read more here from the PICO National Network.

From a Guardian article about hearing: “I would tell anyone at this point: don’t do it. Do not do it. If I had known what I know now about payday loans, I never would have looked their way,” he said.   The Guardian: Payday loan borrowers: ‘When are we going to be done paying these people?’

Consumers also shared their experiences during the public comment period- below are retweets about the stories:Car Title borrower

payday borrower

New Economics For Women shared a consumer story that illustrates how the debt cycle works:

When Lorena (Alias), of Los Angeles, CA, found herself in a tight financial spot, she turned to payday lending….She visited a Speedy Cash location in Los Angeles, CA and borrowed $255, paying $45 in fees and hoping to be able to pay it back in two weeks time….Unfortunately, that was not enough time for her to stabilize her finances, and she had to repeat the loan. She has now repeated the loan 7 times, paying $315 in fees alone….Not only has she had to pay the added $315, she has also acquired overdraft fees. On five occasions, Speedy Cash has taken the money out of her bank account while she was still waiting on disability checks to come in, adding $175 to her expenses, due to payday lending….Hoping to catch up on some of her expenses and be able to get rid of the initial payday debt, she took out a second loan at Speedy Cash for $2,600. However, that loan did not help her at all and has instead dragged her deeper into the cycle of debt. In addition to the repeat loans every two weeks, Lorena now has to pay $38 every two weeks to repay the $2,600 loan. She has fallen behind on her bills and rent and has reached out to family and friends for help. Currently she owes Speedy Cash $2,755 and can only see that amount growing as time goes by.

3. Besides personal stories, research on payday and car title loans has found the products are toxic for the majority of people who use them- pushing them deeper into a cycle of debt.

From a new Pew research report on car title loans:

  • Between 6 and 11 percent of title loan borrowers have a car repossessed annually.
  • To repay a title loan, 47 percent report using a cash infusion, such as a tax refund.
  • 66% of car title borrowers believe the industry should be more regulated.

4. Advocates and practitioners advocate based on the stories and experiences of the people they work with:

Adam Rust, Research Director at Reinvestment Partners, spoke about his organization’s work in housing counseling and providing free tax preparation services.  He agreed that they see people facing difficult financial situations, but explained that paydayloans won’t right the ship- instead they’ll only cause people more hardship.

Paulina Gonzalez, executive director of the California Reinvestment Coalition explained in her testimony that “in many of our communities, we need more income, not just credit.”

5. People across the country are concerned about high cost lenders trying to use loopholes to escape regulations- or using cash to wield influence:

NC AFL CIO

lobbyists

6. While the industry tried to play the “we create jobs card” it turns out that’s not true either:

According to a report from the Insight Center for Community Economic Development, the payday loan industry was responsible for a net loss of over 14,000 jobs in 2011, and a net economic loss of over $750 million.  Bankruptcies that are triggered by payday loans were responsible for another $169 million net economic loss.

7. States like North Carolina and New York that got rid of payday lenders don’t want them back.  

Carlene McNulty, an attorney from the North Carolina Justice Center, commented that North Caorlina had kicked payday lenders out ten years earlier- and the state doesn’t want them back.

NY payday loans8. Communities notice where payday loan companies locate their stores- and where they don’t:

Where do payday lenders locate

 

Want to learn more about payday and car title loans?  We have a few resources:

1.Over 70 editorials have been written about payday lending- Has your local newspaper written one yet? Take a look: Editorials against payday lending  

2. Ever wonder why people are concerned about payday loans and some of the companies that make them?  Is it the high interest rates? The debt traps they create for their customers?  Their shady collection tactics?  The amount of money they spend lobbying state legislators in order to protect their profits instead of their customers? Maybe it’s the extra fees they don’t disclose? All of the above?  Check out the Payday Lender Hall of Shame.

3. It’s not just payday loans that can be dangerous to your health- it’s also high cost car title loans and high cost installment loans too: Careful! Alternatives to Payday Loans Can Also Be Predatory

4. Thinking about an online payday loan?  Here’s 8 strong reasons not to! (hint: if you don’t like having your identity stolen, steer clear!)  8 Reasons Not to Get an Online Payday Loan